The Ghost Of Nürburg’s Past: The Südschleife
Safer not safe

This was the place considered the safer option in this neck of the German woods. The layout that was only five miles long and had ‘just’ 25 corners. The track that, in relative terms, drivers preferred risking themselves on compared to the alternative to the north: the Nordschleife. This is the Südschleife: the abandoned, emasculated ghost track that clings onto life in the valley shadow of its famous sibling. Safer was a subjective term: the shorter, lower altitude section of the Nürburgring was just as much a challenge – and judging from contemporary reports just as dangerous. But then in the old days everyone was seemingly certifiable anyway…

The Nürburgring Südschleife, the abandoned southern loop of the legendary Nordschleife racing circuit, built in 1927 but mostly destroyed during the building of the modern Grand Prix track

If the North Loop went through and over the forest, the Southen Loop was the forest.

Nurburgring_Sudschleife-03

In general, the Südschleife’s layout reminds me of the old Rouen-Les-Essarts track in northern France – but on steroids. It has the same kind of dual personality: long, fast downhill swoops mirrored by an even quicker, longer run back uphill. But without in any way belittling the fearsome French track, the Südschleife was a different beast altogether.

The Nürburgring Südschleife, the abandoned southern loop of the legendary Nordschleife racing circuit, built in 1927 but mostly destroyed during the building of the modern Grand Prix track

Like its better known brother, the Südschleife was all about speed. There was none of the layout-by-numbers, ‘Ooh, must have a heavy braking area to promote overtaking’ of today’s tracks, just a sinuous game of high-speed thread the needle. Like the Nordschleife that was built at the same time, almost 90 years ago, the Südschleife had no barriers, no run-off, no short-cuts, no second chances. You were on the track or you were in the trees.

Little remains of the Südschleife, photographs are rare and video rarer still. This video from towards the end of the track’s life gives a montage of the layout, unfortunately missing out some of the most impressive corners. But it shows the insanity of throwing buzzbomb midget Formula Vees at a track like the Südschleife. It’s no wonder Germany was producing hardy drivers.

The Nürburgring Südschleife, the abandoned southern loop of the legendary Nordschleife racing circuit, built in 1927 but mostly destroyed during the building of the modern Grand Prix track

I went on a mission to track down the remains of the Southern Loop during August’s Oldtimer Grand Prix at the Nürburgring: the perfect background to go history hunting. Finding the Südschleife is not as straightforward as it might sound. ‘Remains’ is the catch here, as so much of the track was erased during the construction of the modern Grand Prix track between 1982 and ’84.

The Nürburgring Südschleife, the abandoned southern loop of the legendary Nordschleife racing circuit, built in 1927 but mostly destroyed during the building of the modern Grand Prix track

It was a sad end to something that had stood in tandem with the Nordschleife since they were both built as part of the Nürburgring project back in 1927. Now all that’s left is the trace outline of two thirds of the track and blowing leaves over crumbling asphalt.

The Nürburgring Südschleife, the abandoned southern loop of the legendary Nordschleife racing circuit, built in 1927 but mostly destroyed during the building of the modern Grand Prix track

The economic depression that hung over Europe had caused mass unemployment, and Germany was suffering the legacy of its defeat in the First World War. In 1925, 14.1 million Reichmarks were put into a project in the Eifel Mountains to create a new racing track, following on from the creation of Avus in 1921. Work started with the picking out of the southern section of the track, the Südschleife, out of the forest canopy and construction of the accompanying Nordschliefe was completed in 1927.

Nurburgring_Sudschleife-08

The southern section was aimed at national racing and testing, with the longer northern section for international competitions. But the two layouts could also be run as one enormous combined circuit, the Gesamtstrecke, at a length of 17.5 miles – which they were for the first ever race meeting and for much of the early years of the Nürburgring. It was by far the longest purpose-built racing track ever built.

The Nürburgring Südschleife, the abandoned southern loop of the legendary Nordschleife racing circuit, built in 1927 but mostly destroyed during the building of the modern Grand Prix track

The Südschleife endured a tough life though, always playing second fiddle to the Other Circuit. The track was badly damaged during the Second World War by Allied tanks stationed in the area, and though rebuilt before the North Loop in the aftermath (with French government money no less) was used inconsistently as the years rolled on. Weather played an even bigger role in racing on the Südschleife than on the Nordschleife: its lower elevation meant that it was even more prone to being draped in mist, and many of the images from the Südschleife’s history show cars emerging from clouds of fog and rain.

The Nürburgring Südschleife, the abandoned southern loop of the legendary Nordschleife racing circuit, built in 1927 but mostly destroyed during the building of the modern Grand Prix track

It was infrequently used for competition in comparison to the more open and impressive North Loop, though when it was pressed into service it made its mark, like the original Eifelrennen events. There was also the epic 84-hour Marathon De La Route, run across the Gesamtstrecke.

The Nürburgring Südschleife, the abandoned southern loop of the legendary Nordschleife racing circuit, built in 1927 but mostly destroyed during the building of the modern Grand Prix track

After a bright decade of increased use during the 1960s, by 1970 races were back down to a trickle (there was time for one last Marathon De La Route), and the final ever race on the Südschleife took place in 1971, a Formula 3 event. A phase of major rebuilding then took place – but only on the Nordschleife. Bits of old armco even ended up lining the remains of Scharfer Kopf. You can see some amazing contemporary pictures of what the Northern Loop looked like here. On this second set of pictures, I love the fact that the Döttinger Höhe straight is bordered on either see by manicured hedges. Just the things to stop an out of control car.

The Nürburgring Südschleife, the abandoned southern loop of the legendary Nordschleife racing circuit, built in 1927 but mostly destroyed during the building of the modern Grand Prix track

The Südschliefe remained open until 1975 as part of the tourist route – yes, just like the Nordschleife today, the Southern Loop was also an open, public road available for Touristenfahrten. But then, with Lauda’s accident fresh in the mind and safety finally beginning to overtake optimism, time was called on the Südschleife and the bulldozers moved in.

On the hunt for the Südschleife
The Nürburgring Südschleife, the abandoned southern loop of the legendary Nordschleife racing circuit, built in 1927 but mostly destroyed during the building of the modern Grand Prix track

Tracing the route of the Südschleife from beginning to end starts off with disappointment, but ends in joy. The original starting straight, the 20m wide and 500m long Start und Ziel Platz, was erased when work on the modern GP track started in 1982. Now there’s the new start-finish straight, its accompanying line of grandstands and ‘that’ line of Ring Boulevard buildings. Also gone is the daunting opening flurry of corners, which were hit after the cars ducked down under a bridge carrying the local road. Nowadays it’s the inverse, with the local road running under the track.

The Nürburgring Südschleife, the abandoned southern loop of the legendary Nordschleife racing circuit, built in 1927 but mostly destroyed during the building of the modern Grand Prix track

Another section no longer here is the original iconic hairpin of Südkehre, which was the opening corner for races on the Nordschleife, and the Stichstrasse, which was a link straight that ran below Südkehre and allowed the Südschleife to be run as a separate entity. All there is now is car park…

The Nürburgring Südschleife, the abandoned southern loop of the legendary Nordschleife racing circuit, built in 1927 but mostly destroyed during the building of the modern Grand Prix track

You pick up the Südschleife on the K72 local road, slightly below the parking lot. In front, a beautifully smooth, freshly-laid road that follows the trace of the Südschleife, if not the exact line. The rough edges and harsher radiuses have been shaved down for the sensibilities of the modern driver.

The Nürburgring Südschleife, the abandoned southern loop of the legendary Nordschleife racing circuit, built in 1927 but mostly destroyed during the building of the modern Grand Prix track

But again, as with the similarly erased Rouen, it’s still possible to get the feel of the track from the modern remake.

The Nürburgring Südschleife, the abandoned southern loop of the legendary Nordschleife racing circuit, built in 1927 but mostly destroyed during the building of the modern Grand Prix track

The road snakes downhill through a series of curves, first left-right, then right-left, then left-right-left through Bränkekopf.

The Nürburgring Südschleife, the abandoned southern loop of the legendary Nordschleife racing circuit, built in 1927 but mostly destroyed during the building of the modern Grand Prix track

A short straight then leads to an opening out of the corners, with the tighter apexes of the previous sequences turning into a faster flow.

The Nürburgring Südschleife, the abandoned southern loop of the legendary Nordschleife racing circuit, built in 1927 but mostly destroyed during the building of the modern Grand Prix track

Drivers cruising between the municipal camping and the local highways seem by and large unaware of the history of the road they’re traversing.

The Nürburgring Südschleife, the abandoned southern loop of the legendary Nordschleife racing circuit, built in 1927 but mostly destroyed during the building of the modern Grand Prix track

Opposite the campsite is one of the few overt surviving momentos from the racing era: a concrete telephone post that once stood by a marshal’s stand at the Aschenschlag corner.

The Nürburgring Südschleife, the abandoned southern loop of the legendary Nordschleife racing circuit, built in 1927 but mostly destroyed during the building of the modern Grand Prix track

The odd passing car at least shares DNA with the racing predecessors who used to pound the same stretch of tarmac.

The Nürburgring Südschleife, the abandoned southern loop of the legendary Nordschleife racing circuit, built in 1927 but mostly destroyed during the building of the modern Grand Prix track

During major race meetings the interior of the Südschleife is used for parking (you can also see them in the Google Maps images towards the top of the article) and again, I’m sure the majority don’t appreciate the heritage.

The Nürburgring Südschleife, the abandoned southern loop of the legendary Nordschleife racing circuit, built in 1927 but mostly destroyed during the building of the modern Grand Prix track

The Seifgen sequence follows: an ever faster quartet of corners staring off with a shallow left.

The Nürburgring Südschleife, the abandoned southern loop of the legendary Nordschleife racing circuit, built in 1927 but mostly destroyed during the building of the modern Grand Prix track

The left transitions into a harder right and quick double left before once again opening out. I would imagine that it was incredibly easy to lose track of which sequence you were up to during a race.

The Nürburgring Südschleife, the abandoned southern loop of the legendary Nordschleife racing circuit, built in 1927 but mostly destroyed during the building of the modern Grand Prix track

As the track reaches its lowest point, drivers were presented with the swooping challenge of Bocksberg. It’s the most southerly point on the track, five miles as the crow flies from the northernmost corner of the Nordschleife at Bergwerk.

The Nürburgring Südschleife, the abandoned southern loop of the legendary Nordschleife racing circuit, built in 1927 but mostly destroyed during the building of the modern Grand Prix track

This is where it’s easy to get confused as to where the old track splits off. The modern road goes on ahead, bypassing the village of Müllenbach; a stretch of tarmac to the inside of the apex can lead you astray…

The Nürburgring Südschleife, the abandoned southern loop of the legendary Nordschleife racing circuit, built in 1927 but mostly destroyed during the building of the modern Grand Prix track

Not helping are pieces of coloured concrete lying in the grass there. Old sections of broken-up kerb perhaps? It’s easy to act like you’re an amateur archeological sleuth and be misled accordingly.

The Nürburgring Südschleife, the abandoned southern loop of the legendary Nordschleife racing circuit, built in 1927 but mostly destroyed during the building of the modern Grand Prix track

The Südschleife actually tracked a wider radius, heading off left down what is now a nondescript gravel track leading to an industrial estate on the edge of the village of Müllenbach.

The Nürburgring Südschleife, the abandoned southern loop of the legendary Nordschleife racing circuit, built in 1927 but mostly destroyed during the building of the modern Grand Prix track

The gravel turns into a short stretch of tarmac. At the end, this anonymous cul-de-sac loop is all that marks the famous Müllenbach 90-degree corner, that saw the Südschleife turn north-east and uphill for the long return run to the finish line.

The Nürburgring Südschleife, the abandoned southern loop of the legendary Nordschleife racing circuit, built in 1927 but mostly destroyed during the building of the modern Grand Prix track

A construction site now sits atop where the track used to run, but the line of the circuit is visible in the ring lighter-colour tree-line in the distance.

The Nürburgring Südschleife, the abandoned southern loop of the legendary Nordschleife racing circuit, built in 1927 but mostly destroyed during the building of the modern Grand Prix track

This part of the track has all but gone, with just this small section possibly on the line of the original.

The trees are alive
The Nürburgring Südschleife, the abandoned southern loop of the legendary Nordschleife racing circuit, built in 1927 but mostly destroyed during the building of the modern Grand Prix track

Crossing the main road, the next section is the where it all becomes worthwhile for the history buff with emotion to spare. It’s the high point in both the literal and figurate sense, where you get to walk on the crumbling, fragile remains of the real Südschleife track as it winds its way uphill.

The Nürburgring Südschleife, the abandoned southern loop of the legendary Nordschleife racing circuit, built in 1927 but mostly destroyed during the building of the modern Grand Prix track

As cars pass by on the modern L93 road that runs outside the track and the sound of racing engines drift down from the modern Grand Prix track above, there’s time to enjoy the slow ascent and let your imagination run wild.

The Nürburgring Südschleife, the abandoned southern loop of the legendary Nordschleife racing circuit, built in 1927 but mostly destroyed during the building of the modern Grand Prix track

You can breath in the history of the racing that happened here: it’s in the trees and the grass as much as the concrete below your feet.

The Nürburgring Südschleife, the abandoned southern loop of the legendary Nordschleife racing circuit, built in 1927 but mostly destroyed during the building of the modern Grand Prix track

It’s a long way to walk – a mile or so – but your mind can wander during the uphill stroll. Ones enjoyment is directly correlated to the emotional freedom you allow yourself: you can seize on every small piece of exposed concrete or rut as having heritage. Did Caracciola drift through here in the ’30s, or Jack Brabham in the ’60s?

The Nürburgring Südschleife, the abandoned southern loop of the legendary Nordschleife racing circuit, built in 1927 but mostly destroyed during the building of the modern Grand Prix track

There’s even evidence of life post-racing, with auto testing taken to another level with the installation of rumble strips. At least, I assume they weren’t there in period… I wouldn’t be surprised in a way – this was seen as being ‘easier’ than the Nordschleife after all!

The Nürburgring Südschleife, the abandoned southern loop of the legendary Nordschleife racing circuit, built in 1927 but mostly destroyed during the building of the modern Grand Prix track

The track continues its relentless rise upwards, steeper than it looks. This is likely where the track appears the most real: the trees encroach on either side, with just drainage ditches where armco should surely have been had anyone thought it appropriate to invent at the time.

The Nürburgring Südschleife, the abandoned southern loop of the legendary Nordschleife racing circuit, built in 1927 but mostly destroyed during the building of the modern Grand Prix track

Looking at the track map, there appear to be few corners, but in reality the speed of ascent would have made every kink a journey into the unknown.

The Nürburgring Südschleife, the abandoned southern loop of the legendary Nordschleife racing circuit, built in 1927 but mostly destroyed during the building of the modern Grand Prix track

Finally the top of the hill is reached, with cars bursting out over the cambered, arcing crest only to be confronted with a sharp hairpin.

The Nürburgring Südschleife, the abandoned southern loop of the legendary Nordschleife racing circuit, built in 1927 but mostly destroyed during the building of the modern Grand Prix track

The track cuts back on itself before again reversing direction around the long, lazy carousel curve of Scharfer Kopf and onto the return straight.

The Nürburgring Südschleife, the abandoned southern loop of the legendary Nordschleife racing circuit, built in 1927 but mostly destroyed during the building of the modern Grand Prix track

Here the old track is replaced by a modern access road, which opens out where Scharfer Kopf kept up its never-ending spiral.

The Nürburgring Südschleife, the abandoned southern loop of the legendary Nordschleife racing circuit, built in 1927 but mostly destroyed during the building of the modern Grand Prix track

The slope is now cut through by the 258 main road that runs up parallel with Döttinger Höhe, running through the artificial crevasse that bisects the original course of the Südschleife, with the twin bridges above supporting the outward and return legs of the Grand Prix track.

Nurburgring_Sudschleife-44

Like the outward run of the Start und Ziel Platz, the long parallel return is now buried under the paddock of the Grand Prix track – which is known derogatorily as the Ersatzring – and the Nordkehre loop at the top end is gone under a grandstand. This contemporary postcard shows what an impressive construction it was. Interestingly, the combination of the Südkehre and Nordkehre linked by the long parallel straights was also occasionally used in a layout known as the Betonschleife: a high speed track that aped Avus.

The Nürburgring Südschleife, the abandoned southern loop of the legendary Nordschleife racing circuit, built in 1927 but mostly destroyed during the building of the modern Grand Prix track

So there you have it. The dead track still sits there, gently decaying, draped around the valley surrounding the lower part of the infant Grand Prix circuit. I think it’s a mistake to think of the Südschleife as the poor relation of the better known Nordschleife: more it’s the unsung older brother. It complemented the northern section, making it even more impressive together than apart.

The Nürburgring Südschleife, the abandoned southern loop of the legendary Nordschleife racing circuit, built in 1927 but mostly destroyed during the building of the modern Grand Prix track

The lesson? The Südschleife is barely mentioned in histories of the track, and its name has been reduced to the title given to the 100 yard stretch of road in the industrial estate. It’s a salutary reminder that you can never be blasé about what we have: all it takes is the political wind to change or money to funnel in a different direction, and it could be the Nordschleife that we’re calling a lost track of Europe.

The Nürburgring Südschleife, the abandoned southern loop of the legendary Nordschleife racing circuit, built in 1927 but mostly destroyed during the building of the modern Grand Prix track

So visit the Nordschleife by all means – but don’t forget to pay your respects down south.

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107 comments

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1

Fantastically well written piece. Cheers Jonathan!

2

That was awesome! I do get an eerie feeling when reading such articles. Its pretty amazing to stand and explore a part of history like this during a time when cars were so much different, and the fact that the track was originally built at an even more different time when our minds were in a different place.

3

Didn't even know such a track existed. It`s a sad story but at least now more people will know about it, like me thanks to you

4

just a little info I'd like to add, those Google Earth pictures were taken during the "Rock Am Ring" music festival. Thats why you can see camp sites all around the GP track, next to Döttinger Höhe and on parts of the Nordschleife

5

Now competition in tracks alot worse than Südschleife is called Rally, and nobody bats an eye!  : )

7

i remember racing in it in Rfactor. And it was a really liked it, I thought that was a good alternative to his bigger brother. 
I really think that without the nordschleife it would be considered as one of the great historical european tracks

8

I love these old tracks, much more challenging and technical than the newer ones. But, how was this in any way safer than the Nordschleife? Either "you were on the track or you were in the trees". Guess it's true everyone was certifiably mad in those days.

9

Amazing! Thanks for sharing. If I ever could afford, I would buy the whole area and restore the sudschleife. Then hold a tribute 86 hour race on the Gesamtstrecke.
There's something about these old forgotten tracks that makes me want to race them even more than the new ones. Maybe it's the heritage, the exhilarating danger or just the fact that no one ever will again. Ever...

10

Best story you guys have published all year! Nice work Jonathan :D
I'll be adding this to my itinerary on my next trip over!

11

Hi there! I tryed to put in a Picture of an old Danish curcit butt I could not :-( It`s called Roskilde Ring, today its smack in the mittel of a 100.000 people city, Roskilde, butt as late as 1975ish it was still in use, then people complain about the noice and it was destroyed. Today U cant see it was ever there, except if U now it. Just a hint for yuor next storie

12

I haven't been this enthused in an article for a while.
Loved it - shared on our SpeedNation.com.au page

13

Alpha_RT Rfactor is, I assume, a game? Got any details?

14

We need a game to faithfully reproduce all these old tracks!

15

Incredible track, the pictures are excellent as well. I can only imagine driving and photographing a race on that track!

17

Nice to see this being covered Jonathan. The Nurburgring is THE most awesome place for any of us here at Speedhunters.

18

Excellent article. I never knew. Will pay my respects when I visit. Good job.

19

I've wanted to visit the Südschleife since buying the 'Autodrome: Lost Race Circuits of Europe' book several years ago. Well, at the end of next week I'm driving to Germany to do just that. Jonathan, your article will be really useful to us in tracing the old track. Thanks for writing it. I've sent you an email. Regards, Rich.

20

just  a great work! thanks!

21

Thanx for telling us the stroy :-) Next time I'm going to take a walk on the Südschlife.

22

Nice work again, Jonathan. You've made Mike Frison's blog. ;-)
There is a great site with lots of historic info and pics about the Sudschliefe, but I lost the link. Have just spent 30 mins searching for it without luck.

23

Amazing read. Gave me goosebumps.
I wonder how long it takes before some photographer walks along the remains of the Nordschleife and writes a story like this.

24

evanger That's the worry...

25

moleman Yay! :) There is even a book that was published a couple of years back by a Dutch company: The Other Green Hell. I must get a copy...

26

IngeMauseth You'll enjoy it! (Though your legs might not...)

27

@Rich Claridge Cheers Rich - thanks for the mail. :)

28

SmithG23 Even more so when you bear in mind the period the track was active. No barriers, photographers just hanging out by the side of the track... It's a miracle there weren't more accidents! Just as for drivers, we've never had it so safe. I don't think I could be that nonchalant!

29

MilesHayler Yep, for sure. There is an rFactor version around I think...

30

PaulJakubicki Nice one, cheers Paul!

31

PaulJakubicki Nice one, cheers Paul!

32

@The Dane Is that the same place as the rock festival? It seems to be a common thread; racing and music festivals! But the track sounds interesting: I'll have to check it out!

34

AGR Hehe... we're of the same opinion. I feel the same way about Brooklands as well! And, well, every old racetrack if I'm honest... ;)

35

Trentworth Yep, I couldn't really understand that part of it either – it's definitely relative!

36

MariusEngenSkinnes MilesHayler Alpha_RT Funnily enough I was playing this in background as I was writing the article! It was interesting to match their interpretation to my own visit.

37

Acc Ah, I did wonder – i though it might have been for the GP. Good spot! :)

38

@zz It's often difficult to understand the mindset of people even 50 years ago, let alone almost a century ago, with such different social conditions and global issues... It all has to be taken in context I think.

39

@zz It's often difficult to understand the mindset of people even 50 years ago, let alone almost a century ago, with such different social conditions and global issues... It all has to be taken in context I think.

40

big_chris1981 Appreciated!

41

big_chris1981 Appreciated!

42
MariusEngenSkinnes

Jonathan Moore MariusEngenSkinnes MilesHayler Alpha_RT Was the in-game track any good? :)

43
Driveitlikeyoustoleit

It's sad how many great tracks we've lost around the world. Think about it, Sudschleife, Brooklands, old lemans (with the no chicane mulsianne straight). Closer to home in aussieland, Amaroo park, Oran park, Katoomba, old Adelaide Gp circuit,. It really is a sad when you think about how many have gone. Reply if you know a track, let's make a 'in memoriam' track list.

44

The entire 17 mile circuit must have been insane. Would be amazing to see both these forgotten tracks recreated in a game, it won't be the same, but as close as we'll ever get.

45

Another great story Jonathan.
My sister and I walked the Norschleife in June, it's a memory I will never forget. It's difficult to explain to people why we walked and experienced the track and didn't drive it.
If only we had more energy, I would have loved to follow the Sudschleife.

46
FlorinelBrasoveanu

yes

47

Hi there! It is in the same city as the Festival butt with half a mile or so in betveen, so if U go, U can go around first of july and hear some music as well :-)

48

I had the same feeling when I walked over the remnants of the chicanes on the legendary old Hockenheim circuit in 2002, shortly after it was destroyed by the "Green" movement...  impossible to describe the silence, the stillness where once speed was the microcosm, the spooky contrast.
 Reading this article I had this same feeling all over again.
Amazing job and definitely another angle of looking into motorsport history.

49

georgievski32 It's such  shame that they've fully destroyed all of the old Hockenheim track – unbelievable! They could at least have left it as a country path or something.. anything! What a waste!

50

Meanace Wow, you walked Nords?! That's some trek - especially on the way up from Bergwerk to the Karussell!

51

Marco Maas Amen to that! :)

52

Great story Jonathan - I'm really glad we got to experience what's left of the track. Even if it did involve sitting in a car parked at 45 degrees and walking until my legs felt like they were going to give way. :)

53

Driveitlikeyoustoleit Solitude is another old German track to look out for (apparently some of the race track still exists in road form - another Germany trip perhaps?), and of course there's Rouen that Jonathan mentions.

54

Great story & photos Jonathan, wouldn't mind a proper wander around the old circuit myself. I'll add that to another track I'll not
get the chance to drive around, like the old GP circuit at Crystal Palace, that I saw a certain James Hunt race on in my youth !

55

Great story & photos Jonathan, wouldn't mind a proper wander around the old circuit myself. I'll add that to another track I'll not
get the chance to drive around, like the old GP circuit at Crystal Palace, that I saw a certain James Hunt race on in my youth !

56

SuzyWallace Meanace Yep from Adenauer Forst to the GP track. My legs are still buring at the thought of that hill and Pflantzgarten hahaha

57

Meanace SuzyWallace Wow, that's good going. I walked from the tourist entrance to Adenau bridge this year at the N24 race - then the race was called off and we had to face the trip back in the pouring rain. Thank god for tourist buses! :)

58

MatthewDear You can drive around the gesamtstrecke in rFactor. Here's a vid: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zfztyGU2ucA

59

Driving old and then current tracks? I drove the entire Nordschleife in 1976 in my first car, a Fiat 125. Also did the Suedschleife, which was still fully intact then. A great experience going through the Karrussel in a saloon car. Visited Hockenheim in the late seventies basically to the site of jimmy Clark's tragic accident. Anyone know if the site is still marked and accessible? Also, after visiting the Belgian GP in the late seventies I managed to simply drive through an open gate, access the track and do a lap! This was barely an hour or so after the end of the race. Unthinkable these days. Another track that has been lost, of course, is the old Kyalami circuit where I grew up watching Rodriguez, Clark, Brabham and Andretti wind their respective first and last GPs. The revised and shortened track still had elements of the original layout and i have been back to watch races there. Sadly, it seems the track has gone to auction a few months ago. I do not know of the outcome. It was unused when I last visited in January this year. The steady encroachment of the Gauteng region between Pretoria and Johannesburg I fear will claim what's left of it. And then there is Zandvoort - decimated - and Spa. ...... and the list goes on. I drove the entire old Spa circuit in 1977, mostly public roads, with the exception of the Eau Rouge climb which was not accessible. Those were the days.....

60

Chris 'Haffy' Hafner don't forget about the banked oval and combined oval/road circuit at Monza

61

Jonathan Moore georgievski32 Agreed, and you can blame Greenpeace for that. The original plan for modifying Hockenheim was a loop cutting through the woods shortly after the first chicane. But apparently, that would've involved cutting down too many trees. Which doesn't make any sense considering that the new layout looks like it cost the lives of even more trees than that.
I may be an environmentally-conscious racing enthusiast, but I will NEVER forgive the "Green" movement for what they did to that spectacular track.

62

Chris 'Haffy' Hafner Let's not forget Riverside in California. Hosted F1 in 1960, sports cars, NASCAR, and many more being turned into a freaking shopping mall.

63

I've heard about this track before, but after seeing an article on it on Circuits of the Past and on here, I'm now really intrigued. Just as much as I am of Jonathan's article on Clermont-Ferrand. I never get tired of that one.

64

@God Of Gaming MatthewDear That's an incredible track in that video. I bet it would be so much fun to drive in a modern FIA GT3 car. Drivers in the 24 Hours of Nürburgring would have a blast on the Gesamtstrecke.

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Jonathan Moore Acc Rock am Ring is an amazing music festival, and as much a must-see as the Ring is a must-drive.

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Juha Arkkukangas

I really loved this article. Bookmarked!

I think that while it's very sad to see track like this, especially with such a minimal documentation existing about it, in the same time it has that interesting mystic feel to it. Having only the knowledge that there have been races many many decades ago, it feels different kind of good imo.

I'm also very interested in these old, dead tracks, one of the reasons being what I said above. In my opinion the tracks themselves are equally as important as the drivers and cars.

Definitely going to spend lot of time around Sudschleife, whenever I finally get around to visiting Nurburgring!

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@Ulf You just made me extremely jealous :|

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This article is my all time fav. Definitely bookmarking this one

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