Kanjo Tribe: Osaka Night Fighters

From a distance, Japan might look like a pretty uniform nation. It doesn’t matter what area you visit – everyone pretty much speaks the same language, the buildings and streets look similar, the trains always run on time, and the toilets wow with their high tech features. As with any country though, you look closer you look at Japan, the more differences you see. You begin to pick up on unique distinct language dialects, regional cuisine, and unique customs that vary as you travel the country.

It’s the same with cars. The longer I’ve been exposed to Japanese automotive culture, the more I’ve begun to pick up on these regional variations in motoring habits. And of all these “local flavors”, I don’t think there’s anything more distinct than Osaka’s Kanjo culture.

Once I heard that we’d be running FF-themed stories this month, I immediately knew I wanted to put something together on the Kanjozoku. After all, their primary automobile of choice is one of the greatest front wheel drive cars of all time – the Honda Civic. During my time in Osaka earlier this month I was able to spend some an evening (or is that morning?) with these mysterious fellows and their cars. What resulted was another one of those unforgettable Japan experiences.

To be honest, I’ve never been a particularly big Honda guy. I’ve always had a respect for the brand and the cars, but a Civic has never been on my “must-own” list. It may be surprising then, to hear that these Kanjo machines are some of the most fascinating and exciting automobiles I’ve ever seen.

The cars are interesting yes, and the stories behind them are even more interesting. What’s more important though, is that you won’t ever see this sort of thing outside of the Osaka area. Even in Japan, few outside of the Kansai region are familiar with this distinctively local phenomenon.

Before I move on to the cars, I suppose I should answer the question “What is the Kanjo?”. Well, the Kanjo Loop itself is an elevated section of the Hanshin Expressway that circles the center of Osaka in a clockwise direction.

In this map you can see the loop in the center of the image, cutting through the heart of the city, elevated above the streets below. As you can see, there are both “long” and “short” routes available depending on which path you’d like to take.

It’s only natural to compare the Kanjo to what’s probably Japan’s most famous highway route – the Wangan line in Tokyo and Kanagawa. They really couldn’t be more different. The Wangan is long, wide and straight – making it a favorite among drivers of high powered turbo cars. The Kanjo is shorter, narrower and its straights are linked together with tight corners and abrupt transitions. If the Wangan is about power, the Loop is about agility.

Not surprisingly, info on the history of the Kanjo is hard to come by ,and I’m still trying to learn all I can about the beginnings of this movement. The craze kicked off in earnest in the mid 1980s, and the Honda Civic was the popular choice from the get-go. The third generation Civic Si, known as the “Wonder” Civic in Japan became an early favorite among Kanjozoku with is DOHC powerplant and responsive chassis that was well-suited to the loop’s tight bends. You don’t see too many of the classic Wonder Civics today, but they are still loved and respected on the streets of Osaka.

Today the Kanjo scene isn’t anything like it was at it’s peak. Big crackdowns from law enforcement have lead many to retire from driving the loop, and only the most dedicated (and craziest) can still be found out there these days. But even for those who have moved their action from the street to the circuit, the distinct Kanjo vibe can still be felt in their cars and driving style.

Since the beginning, the Kanjozoku have taken much their inspiration from the motorsport world. In the ’80s and ’90s the Civic established itself as a force in Japanese Group A racing, and the loop runners were right behind employing many of the same tricks in both car setup and styling.

It’s not unlike Japan’s Kaido Racers, who are heavily influenced by what are now historic competition vehicles. This EF9 for example is styled very closely after the famous Idemitsu Group A Civic.

The racing-inspired paintjobs have been a staple of the Kanjo world since the beginning. In order to keep watchful eyes guessing, the paint designs on these cars would be changed regularly. Sometimes as often as once a week.

Other cars would instill confusion by running completely different graphic and color patterns on each side. It’s all part of the game.

I was able to catch a quick glimpse into the elusive Kanjo world during my visit to Osaka last year, but this time I was able to take a much more detailed look at the cars and what goes into them.

While most of these Kanjo machines are built of EF9, EG6, and EK4 Civic SiR models, it’s not uncommon to see the occasional Type R out there. The engine modifications are usually not drastic. Pop the hoods on these cars and in most cases you’ll find moderately tuned NA B-series VTEC motors.

If you were under the impression that these Kanjo runners aren’t the “nicest” cars around, you’d be right. Just like a lots of the world’s race cars, these Hondas are dirty, scuffed, dented, and functional. The interiors are stripped bare and things like engine bay presentation are of no concern to these guys.

The same goes for the wheel and tire setups. Tires are dirty. Wheels are often mismatched and covered in brake dust. The wide fenders on this particular EG6 are unpainted, and they will probably stay like that.

The parts might not shine like on show cars, but the choice of modifications is all you need to know about the owner’s intentions. I don’t think I encountered a single car, for example, that wasn’t wearing Advan A048s or some other high grip race tire.

For me, it’s that grittiness that makes these cars so damn interesting. Seeing functional battle-scarred Hondas is not uncommon at track days in Japan, but to see them prowling the street together is completely different.

Another common element among the Kanjozoku is the use of window nets. As you might have gathered by now, these are used less as a safety item and more as a clever way to conceal the driver’s identity.

It’s just one of the many tricks that the Kanjozoku have picked up during their decades of experience on the loop…

But for all the fascinating aspects of Kanjo culture, I think it’s the tribal nature of it all that best defines this underground world. You won’t find many lone wolves on the loop.

The family ties run deep here, and many of the teams have history that goes back to a time before many of us were even born.

The shadowy, often masked figures that build and drive these cars prefer to be identified as team members rather than individuals. As is often the case in Japan, the group comes before the self.

You can sense this when you eye the team logos that cover the windows and bodies of the cars. Temple, Trick, Loose Racing, Pandemic, TOPGUN, Law Break – meaningless names to some, but legendary to those in this circle.

The members of No Good Racing!! (who assembled specifically to help me make this story) have been in the game since 1985. To think I was hardly a year old at that time…

Just being around these guys, it’s easy to pick up the on the fact they’ve been doing this for a long time. All of these guys lead normal lives outside of the Kanjo, but it’s obvious that this is their place.

And for all the mystery and notoriety that surrounds them, when they emerge from their cars these guys are as humble and easy going as it gets. They chat, laugh, and smoke cigarettes just like anyone else…

What is it that draws me toward the Kanjozoku? It’s hard to put my finger on it, but I think it has to do with the unusual contrast. How can something be so chaotic, yet so structured? So completely serious, yet so playful?

It goes beyond being just about cars. You could not know a thing about the Honda Civic (or any car for that matter) and still be amazed by this scene.The Kanjo culture is just so uniquely Japanese. So uniquely Osaka.

Even with all I’ve been able to learn so far, I want to know more. I’m hooked.

I’d like to extend some major thanks to both Tactical Art and No Good Racing!! for their assistance with this story. Without their help and connections it would have been impossible to get this sort of access, and more importantly the insight that helps fill in the story behind this fascinating world.

Speaking of Tactical Art, I’ll be back tomorrow with a peek into their operations.

-Mike


Tags: , , , , , , ,



136 comments
JuanPabloNeira
JuanPabloNeira

Best article ever made, I lived in Japan and reading this acrticle took me back and makes me want to back so bad. Thank you again and please do more articles like this one.

Roncettador
Roncettador

Best Story at Speedhunters i have ever read... maybe even the best Automotive Story i ever read!
Thanks alot Mike! 
More Stuff like this! :D

JMoore
JMoore

The green and red EF9 became an instant favorite when I saw it.


Damn, now I want one.

yanesnyawai
yanesnyawai

Because of TRA Kyoto and Car Craft Boon, everytime I drove on the highway, I'll say, Osaka! Thanks for the insights!

rthirtytwotaka
rthirtytwotaka

Best article ever read in any blog, webpage or magazine. Thanks for this!

WanGan
WanGan

That really is one of the best articles on speedhunters...Thanks for this Mike... 

silvin_sa
silvin_sa

@sasuganinaide 環状ってまだ走ってるん?

greenroadster
greenroadster

No words about actual racing the Loop...or the police.... :)))

exam0110
exam0110

@GTS_four これあかんやつや

LouisSoon
LouisSoon

MAkes me want an old gen Civic

AlexandreSiviero
AlexandreSiviero

What a great story! I'm often fascinated by underground racing: the symbioses it has with the professional sport in form of techniques, drivers and technology, the uniqueness of the groups that partake on it (the touge drifters, the wangan drivers with their insane HPs, this Kanjo group, and this is talking about Japan alone), but most of all the passion of the drivers. These are all people with normal lives and jobs, but who at the same time give 110% towards their passion. I'm constantly torn at the subject, concerning the illegality and the risks involved, but every time I see this amount of passion I can't help but understand it and smile. After all, I'm an auto enthusiast as much as they are. Taking that in consideration, your article had me smile from ear to ear, well done Mike!

Gerben aka Suburuuh
Gerben aka Suburuuh

A non judging story, with great information, you can't read of watching movies online of them. Great article!

Aaron B
Aaron B

Great coverage! I've enjoyed reading about these guys since they were featured in magazines last year. Oh yeah, and I often GREATLY EXCEED the posted speed limit, but always in a SAFE manner.

rook56
rook56

I come for the photos, but I stay for articles like this. Details like the window nets make the story for me. Very clever to explain so much about the people without having to show them. Great work.

Yossarian
Yossarian

Awesome article! At last some nice info about the Kanjo racers!!

weasel
weasel

I like that youve omitted faces, plates and any other identifiers. respect+

xracer6
xracer6

Some raw race preped machines hitting the streets. Pretty sweet. Looks like these guys just left a championship!

EEEEVAN
EEEEVAN

Man, this makes me want to dig out my PS2 and play some Tokyo Xtreme Racer.

JippieK
JippieK

Great story!Get's the Honda heart beating faster :) 

jzx81
jzx81

As a Civic owner it is cool to see this article.

(Had, EF hatch then a EK hatch and now own a EK 4 door.)

The EF was a autocross and time attack car on weekends.

FunctionFirst
FunctionFirst

I love the window nets for obscurity. All I know of Japanese roads I learned from Top Gear mostly, so do they wear helmets and masks to hide their faces from the traffic cameras or are there not really any cameras on the stretch they use? I can see they've got trick license plates, or none at all, what else do they do to hide their identity?

 

Fun article Mike.

Ben Scales
Ben Scales

yes! been checking every hour the past week for this post! thanks Mike!

sasuganinaide
sasuganinaide

@silvin_sa 全然走ってますよ!!!

GTS_four
GTS_four

@exam0110 まあ珍に近いですし

Mike Garrett
Mike Garrett moderator

@AlexandreSiviero Thank you sir!

apex_DNA
apex_DNA

 @JunKit  People don't realize what these cars are capable of, the only FFs (as in majority) to take on the big boys.

apex_DNA
apex_DNA

 @jzx81 EFs are beasts if setup right...whether you stick with the D16A6 (the best SOHC 4-cylinder ever made? Bisimoto comes to mind) or decide to swap it for a more potent powerplant.

Mike Garrett
Mike Garrett moderator

@jzx81 Thanks! I gotta be honest, I've been thinking I may have to try owning a Civic or Integra at one point!

Mike Garrett
Mike Garrett moderator

@FunctionFirst I'm not sure if there are cameras, but even if there were I'm not sure how much good they would do. Hoods, ski masks, and the ever popular Jason mask seem to be the disguises of choice.

Mike Garrett
Mike Garrett moderator

@Ben Scales Glad it was worth the wait! Haha.

silvin_sa
silvin_sa

@sasuganinaide そうなんやw昔の環状シビックそのまんまやな!

weasel
weasel

 @Mike Garrett  @jzx81  ive had a few cars. i currently drive a Z33. i still have a pile of early 90s honda parts in the attic in case i do pull the trigger on one. I dont have any nissan, toyota or mazda parts still laying around... that has to say something..

silvin_sa
silvin_sa

@sasuganinaide F山わからんw

silvin_sa
silvin_sa

@sasuganinaide どこでやってたん⁉

sasuganinaide
sasuganinaide

@silvin_sa 僕も元々ドリフトやったんですけど、周りがシビックばっかりなんでシビック好きになりましたw

silvin_sa
silvin_sa

@sasuganinaide ああw懐かしいwやっぱ影響力あるんやな〜

sasuganinaide
sasuganinaide

@silvin_sa やっぱりナニワトモアレの影響かと…w

silvin_sa
silvin_sa

@sasuganinaide それでもEFとかEGのシビック買って走る人おるんやなwまあかっこいいけどな!

sasuganinaide
sasuganinaide

@silvin_sa そうですねww 昔みたいにアツくはないですがw


OFFICIAL SPEEDHUNTERS SUPPLIERS