Acura Legend, The Bolsa Coffee Shop Cruiser

I think it goes without saying that it takes a special kind of person to decide to build a first-generation Acura Legend. Not surprisingly, Charles Trieu isn’t exactly your average person, but he is one of the more interesting individuals I’ve met in the scene and also a close friend. Coincidentally, he has some of the best taste (at least when it comes to cars) of anyone I know. When Rod had suggested an ’80s theme I knew it was this car’s time to shine, so I recently sat down and had a chat with Charles to talk about cars, magazines and of course “Zelda,” his 1988 Acura Legend.

Speedhunters: To get this party started, can you state the facts for our readers who might not know who you are? Name, occupation, that sort of stuff?

Charles Trieu: My birth name is Charles Trieu and I am currently employed at Import Tuner as editor-in-chief. I have been at Source Interlink for about five years with other titles such as Super Street, where you and I worked side by side cracking open real aftermarket auto journalism articles.

SH: The real hard-hitting stuff you mean…

CT: Yea! It’s a dirty job, but someone’s gotta do it!

SH: How would you say magazines have changed, if at all, since we started at Super Street back in 2008?

CT: Well the Internet has definitely taken away readership from print, that’s not exactly news. The benefit is that it’s made magazine features even more valuable to car owners. We get a lot of enthusiasts that want a printed feature and don’t want to be just another car online. They feel the bar for online cars is too low.

SH: Ya I can definitely see that point, particularly when you consider the vast amount of online outlets these days. I for one love print, and I think a lot of our readers do too, but it’s becoming more and more clear that something needs to change in order for a lot books to survive. What do you think is the solution or the future for successful print media?

CT: Print media will have to look for supplement means of income. Expanding the brand into other avenues like a website, blogs, forums, apparel, shows, merchandise etc.

SH: So you think the concept of printing a magazine in quarterly-, monthly-, weekly- intervals is a dead model? Print magazines simply aren’t strong enough to sustain themselves in today’s world? That’s kind of a sad thought, isn’t it?

CT: The problem there is the printing process will never be as fast as updating a site. So latency hurts that quarterly-, monthly-, weekly- model. No one wants to hear news from a few weeks ago. Magazines won’t die though, but only the strong will survive.

SH: That’s very true, but I’d argue the fact that there are less time-sensitive things that magazines can report on, and spend the extra time and effort to polish it in a way that most web outlets cannot.

CT: I agree.

SH: Regardless, the thought of losing the medium all together is depressing to me. For some reason having no magazines seems like a much more horrific jump than vinyl to MP3 or film to memory cards. Anyway, moving along I have a two part question. First, what do you think you’d be doing now if you had never landed in the magazine industry? And secondly, where do you think you’ll go if and when you leave?

CT: I don’t really know, I don’t plan much. I don’t ever even plan what I’m going to do even later today, so I’m not sure what I’d be doing. Something car related probably, I can never get away from it. I really never get tired of cars.

SH: Spoken like a man after my own heart. While on the subject of cars, I guess we should start getting down to the real reason we’re talking – the Legend. First and foremost, why on earth did you buy, let alone build, this car?

CT: (Laughs) Just another one of my visions I guess.

SH: Would you say that building cars is your art? I’ve always found you have very good taste and a knack for building interesting cars that get it “right.” 

CT: There are a lot of cars that I want to see done a certain way. I guess I get satisfied with most of the typical cars being built by people, but there are those atypical cars that stay in my head for years and when nobody else builds them, then I have to do it myself. Then after it’s finished it’s always time to sell the projects just to fund the next; it’s an endless cycle.

SH: Sounds like art to me… Do you feel as though you influence the car scene with any of your builds?

CT: I’d like to think so, but I don’t know. I don’t really make a big splash with my cars. Perhaps I move on too quickly before very many people notice. Maybe I did with the Civic or the Cressida?

SH: I think virtually all of your cars have had some affect on people, certainly the people “in the know.”

CT: Thank you! I know at the very least building my cars got the attention of my coworkers and eventually earned my current position.

SH: Since I know people are going to ask about them, let’s talk about the wheels for a minute. Where did you find them, why are the special, all that sort of stuff?

CT: I found the wheels on a forum, just wheels – no covers, no caps. It was really odd for these wheels to be in these specs: 17×9″ +15 with the 4×114.3 bolt pattern. I checked them out and they were legit and all original. I knew in 1982, the year of the manufacturing date stamp, no one was running anything this big or aggressive on any 4×114.3 car from Japan. I was also a bit suspicious of the lip stickers that read “Competition Use Only,” so I called up Mackin (Rays distribution) and asked them. They told me what I suspected, that these came off some touring race car.

SH: That’s a pretty cool story, bro. So where did you find the rest of the bits?

CT: I had the wheels restored and the lip stickers remade exactly to spec, then later on I found the wheel covers in Japan. For the center caps I had to buy another set of 15″ wheels to scavenge them off and then resold them. Even though the caps and covers are pretty rare, the wheels themselves in these sizes are even rarer. In fact, the faces aren’t the same as the ones used in the 15″ version, these have less markings, are lighter and bigger for the 17″ lips and they only weigh 14lbs. I’m kind of an old school wheel guru, an old school parts whore actually – especially ’80s and ’90s Japanese race stuff.

SH: It’s truly unfortunate that your good taste ends with cars! (Laughing)

CT: (Laughs) Oh come on, have u seen my taste in movies? Or in music?

SH: On the flip side of the coin, what inspires you when you’re building a car? Can you site some of the places you drew inspiration from on this build?

CT: Well with the Legend I wanted something different. Everyone’s been building boso cars and crazy ass Hondas. This is a bit different, it’s a car that’s too FF for VIP, too new for boso and too old for a typical Honda.

SH: It’s Bolsazoku!

CT: It’s one of the chassis that I always thought looked good, but never built. So I made it with era-specific parts as I usually try to do.  All ’80s instead of ’90s or ’70s like everyone else is doing. The ’70s had your curvy Japanese cars and the ’90s had your more refined modern cars, but the ’80s was boxy gross shit.

SH: That’s actually exactly why we chose the car for a feature. I know I didn’t tell you this before, but we’re doing a special ’80s theme which fits your car perfectly. But aside from just gathering parts and bolting them on, was there anywhere that you drew inspiration from? Movies? Childhood? Other cars from back in the day?

CT: I don’t really recall too many first-gen Legend coupes being modified; there were a couple but they were always gross. Everyone got into the second-gen. People can’t believe I did all of it either, everyone thinks I found it with the audio and car phone. I had to find that Alpine tape deck, EQ, car phone and alarm!

SH: I’m sure that was no easy task! You’ve always seemed to have a vast knowledge of virtually all things JDM, no matter the car or scene, you seem to know just about every part and brand around. How do you go about gathering all that information which is obviously later translated into your builds?

CT: I don’t know how to explain it, but I know you’re one of the few people that get it. Guys like us just pay attention to brands, trends, and things; we see where people are trying to go so we know how to either be there first or avoid it and go a different route. It just comes from surfing the net and looking at japanese magazines like everyone else. We just see things differently and retain different stuff than other people do.

SH: It’s weird looking at the car scene and trying to identify who’s doing what, but I’d say you’re certainly one of the innovators. In that sense, it’s quite refreshing to see someone like yourself responsible for a media outlet because it gives you the chance to express your ideas to the public, whereas I find that role is traditionally filled by someone in the early majority demographic. Do you ever feel as though you’re the slave to your readers? Surely you would feature some far more “interesting” cars if sales weren’t a concern…

CT: I don’t know if I do really consider sales when it comes to features (laughing). I have been slowly injecting my personal car taste into the magazine, but I can’t just dump my style on everyone. No one will get it, I’ve got to ease them into it like I did you (more laughing). Then afterwards, you never like anyone else’s cars and your standards will never be fulfilled!

SH: (Laughing) Well I think if you did 100% Trieu it would work in the long run, because you’d have no other competition. I remember my biggest fear with you going away from Super Street was “shit, now I’m going to have to fight Charles for all the cool cars!”  

CT: (Laughs)

SH: Going back for a second, when you say you can’t just “dump your personal car taste into the magazine,” do you think your readers would “get” the Legend?

CT: Well we all like to see badass cars. I don’t know what is about us guys, but it’s like programmed in our DNA – like loving boobies. Something about a car on the floor just makes us look in awe. At the moment I still have the magazine’s car features at a pretty high standard, but one thing the Legend lacks is engine performance. I really wanted to do a K24 or a J-series swap, but I’m also pretty realistic with my goals (laughing). I’ve got a long list of cars to own, and that’s just of the cars currently made. I can’t spend five-plus-years on one project anymore, duly noted.

SH: It seems more like you look at cars with a vision and feel the need to make something exist. Then once that thing exists, like this Legend, you set it free and sell it to someone else who can then take it to its full potential – i.e. an engine swap. But had you not shared your vision with the world, they probably would never have given this chassis a second look to begin with.What would you say is the main hurdle to building a car like this? Is the lack of aftermarket support a real problem or can that be overcome with creativity?

CT: Anything can be overcome with creativity. Sometimes I think I select cars that are harder to do just for the challenge. Or sometimes the builds in my head are of typical cars and I challenge myself to figure out how I would make a popular chassis novel. Sometimes I’ll do a build strictly for a part, like my first car – a ’90 Integra. I bought it with my first financial aid check, strictly because I wanted do JDM one-piece headlights that were so rare at the time.

SH: Ahh yes, that brings me to another interesting question. Many times it seems as if you will collect parts for months – even years – before you buy a certain car. Do you think that the temptation to build comes from the car itself or simply the idea of having certain modifications done to it?

CT: It comes in both forms. A lot of times I’ll find a part that I’ve always wanted, then afterwards I’ll have to buy the car just to use it. But sometimes I buy the car just because I wanted to do something to it, but I might not have any idea just what it is until later.

SH: How many cars do you currently own?

CT: Hmm, four i think.

SH: Care to list them?

CT: This ’88 Acura Legend KA3, an ’83 Toyota Corolla AE72 hardtop, an ’01 Porsche 911 Turbo 996 and an ’05 Nissan Xterra N50 which is my daily driver.

SH: Wow you still have the hardtop!? That’s amazing, what a pile that thing is (laughing). How many cars do you currently own parts for?

CT: (Laughing) I probably have parts for another half-dozen cars. Parts to build a complete NSX or two. RX-7 parts, a ton of S14 parts… All kinds of shit everywhere that I forget I even have sometimes!

SH: I know that feeling (laughs). 

CT: I’ll be in the garage working and see something and be like “damn that’s badass, how’d I find that?” or “damn that thing cost me so much money and its just sitting there now!” (Laughing).

SH: Story of my life man. 

CT: You know in hindsight I would have suggested facetime, but I feel really awkward doing that with another male, it just doesn’t feel right.

SH: (Laughing) You know you can wear pants while you’re using it right? It’s all good man, I think we’re pretty much done anyway. On that note, is there anything else you want people to know about the car? Like the fact that it’s for sale maybe?

CT: Yea it is. Three potential buyers deemed themselves unworthy of ownership at the last minute, so it’s still up for grabs. Get it before I break it apart, I need the space! I’ve got parts piling up for the next projects.

SH: Word up! Well thanks for taking some time to chat with me man. Get some sleep.

Well folks, there you have it, the story of a boy and his car. Should you wish to own such a beastly relic from the ’80s you can find out more about how to make a purchase here.

1988 Acura Legend Coupe

ENGINE

Naturally aspirated 2.7L C27A V6

ENGINE MANAGEMENT AND ELECTRONICS

Alpine car alarm, tape deck, equalizer, and car phone (not hooked up); Sony Discman

SUSPENSION / CHASSIS

DGR custom fit coilovers with proper spring rates

WHEELS / TIRES

17×9″ +15 Volk Artisan Fins

BODY

JDM corner lights, headlights w/fog lights, ’90 clear/red tailights, ’90 front grille, OEM rear wing spoiler, ’90 model color-matched side mirrors

Charles’ personal site

More from ’80s week on Speedhunters

More stories by Sean Klingelhoefer on Speedhunters

-Sean


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104 comments
milwaukee414
milwaukee414

do anybody know where i can get that spoiler? please

AnthonyCrawford
AnthonyCrawford

plain and simple to maintain is the best =) clean ride

 

RaySpijk
RaySpijk

I'm from The Netherlands. Coffeeshops are a bit different at my country.

NicholasDixon
NicholasDixon

I have a 1990 Legend L Sedan with a 5-speed and they truly are a fantastic car. The C27A1 may lack in power but it is a smooth-running engine and it makes all the right noises. Too bad a lot of people forget about one of the cars that truly started Acura off.

VecTT
VecTT

Wouldn't mind one of those for a daily driver, what a slick cruiser!

DaveYamato
DaveYamato

Great Homage to the days of yore.

Sam
Sam

Wow, what a non event.

gotrice
gotrice

Charles' Legend doesn't fit what many people here would consider a build, being a race car and what not. Definitely, this isn't a car to track or even street race. However, this car is reminiscent of the beginnings of the "import car" scene that started here in Southern California. If you weren't trying to make your Honda go faster, you would at least fix it up "for looks", which is probably what 80% of the Hondas were like in the early 90s, just for looks rather than street racing or at Battle of the Imports (hard to tell of course). Many of the early pioneers were of Asian descent, so these were the kind of cars you would see in many enclaves in So Cal (SGV, Orange County, South Bay) before the "scene" spread in the years to come.

 

I can only surmise why Charles' car is so special to him can be due to the fact that it brings up memories of "back in the day" (1990s). Charles is Vietnamese based on his last name, hence the Bolsa and coffee shop references. The scene started with primarily Asians of all races in the area (Japanese, Korean, Viet, Chinese, Filipino, etc.). This was probably why many called the scene "gang-related" back in the day too as well, though not Asian that drove a Honda was a "gangster". The Hondas/Acuras/imports back then looked like more like this, though most were at the age that couldn't afford Japanese wheels and obviously, there wasn't hellaflush/stance then, and many did "slam" their cars by doing the ghetto thing of cutting springs.

JDMized
JDMized

Sean, I personally don't like it. Like many others, it doesn't tell me much.

A piece of advice: perhaps you should ask Charles to join SH, or at least have him drop few lines on here and read what he has to say in his defense regarding his pride and joy.

Again, not hating on the car at all; but I am curious to hear the owner's prospective, and read WHY it's so special to him.

w
w

OMG what a poser. Analog phone does not work.

weasel
weasel

so then build an NSX or two...

Papi
Papi

A classic Acura flagship, love it. He kept it stock yet classy looking. Perfect DD imho, and a rare sight to see one this clean. The fact that people are disappointed because it's not an over the top s13 or mustang is laughable. You guys should do some more less well-known cars in the future to break the mold.

izzy_ortiz
izzy_ortiz

wonder if the phone works?

 

 

perpetualroad.wordpress.com

Kankels
Kankels

Ironic how he says other modded Legends are gross yet his Legend looks worse then a craigslist special

xXxBROxXx
xXxBROxXx

Sean, you are a good dude, man.  Keep on trucking

Coca Scola
Coca Scola

Fancy autotrader ad.  If you're going to use Bolsa in the title at least shoot the pics recognizable spots.  Not everyone is from Westminster and knows what "Bolsa Coffee Shop" entails...

greenroadster
greenroadster

Question for Charles:

1.If you were to buy a JZZ30 Soarer...what you think that you would do to the car to look "just right"?

2.And with whar wheels?

Thanks man.

RobbyDeGraff
RobbyDeGraff

Awesome looking car, such an instant classic

guReMcO
guReMcO

Love it! So much '80 swag going on here it's insane.

koko san
koko san

There's nothing wrong in featuring an almost stock but rare car, besides that the article is not only about the car but also about the owner, the vintage entertainment system, the gloves and the massive phone add a fresh touch of humor. Having been a teenager in the 80's, so far I enjoyed all the articles you guys have posted this days.

TRDAE86
TRDAE86

So much porn on his site!! 

Nico Leone
Nico Leone

Lol love it, the phone is pimp !

varilight
varilight

Not worthy of a feature at all.

apex_DNA
apex_DNA

Your stance doesn't work.

Spike4090
Spike4090

@izzy_ortiz 

ENGINE MANAGEMENT AND ELECTRONICS

Alpine car alarm, tape deck, equalizer, and car phone (not hooked up); Sony Discman

 

Eh
Eh

Why are you asking someone else to tell you how your car should look?

bigeastbay
bigeastbay

 @varilight come on dude, this car is pretty sweet. You could see a Ferrari or a tuned Mustang any day of the week but to come up with something like this, you just don't see things like it. Even if this style isn't your bag, at least appreciate the work it takes to get to that point.

SlavaRussky
SlavaRussky

Maybe he wants some ideas? Why do people hire interior designers? Sometimes a suggestion can put you on the right path to your perfect car.

varilight
varilight

@apex_DNA What does my favourite RWD have anything to do with this discussion at all? I would have said the exact same thing if it was an AE86.

varilight
varilight

@bigeastbay I respect cars which aren't even my style if there is some reasonable work done to it. This is essentially a lowered old legend on rare rims. Whoa slow down on the ingenuity there!

apex_DNA
apex_DNA

@Harry Q Allstar@SlavaRussky No, more like a Viet tribute to the early sport compact days, so don't "hate" (as ricers like to say). Not a simple car, not so simple rims, and definitely not simply for sale. What hype? Hype is Ben Sopra, the new 86, RWD this and RWD that...and as for pre-sale, this car has been for sale for quite some time now.

Harry Q Allstar
Harry Q Allstar

 @apex_DNA  @SlavaRussky Not innovation, just late 80's nostalgia. Simple car, simple rims, simply for sale. Don't get caught up in the pre-sales hype...

apex_DNA
apex_DNA

 @SlavaRussky What are you talking about? This IS innovation...if it wasn't for cars like these, I don't think SH would even exist.

greenroadster
greenroadster

@Eh...Why do you read this site and take notice of what is cool? Do us a favor and just dream alone on the cars and leave us to talk in a community. Bye!

Eh
Eh

 @SlavaRussky

 It can also void the scene of innovation and leave us with a community full of sheep.

apex_DNA
apex_DNA

@varilight I undestand where you're coming from, and I guess what I wanted, was to present you with another point of view. What made SH great (and still makes, to a degree) versus a magazine, is the ability to collaborate with people in the industry and show you behind-the-scenes look without any politics involved.

varilight
varilight

@apex_DNA Well it seems we won't ever agree. Just a few last comments. Maybe I am spoiled I expect better and have certainly seen better from the Speedhunters staff and if this were in a magazine I for one wouldn't buy it.

apex_DNA
apex_DNA

 @varilight "By what you've said then my car is almost worthy of a feature then!"

 

Maybe it is, for all I know.

 

"One of my main points of contention is that no where did Charles or Sean mention any restoration of the Legend at all."

 

Sometimes you get lucky. After all, finding one that doesn't require restoration makes it that much more special.

 

"There's no history."

 

It's a tribute. Yours can be too.

 

"To me it was simply choosing an old car slapping on some old rims and accessories and Bam done."

 

It's not that simple, and you should know better.

 

"As I've said before not saying the car isn't nice, I'm just stating that compared to the other caliber of builds on SH this just doesn't stack up."

 

You've been spoiled. Go buy a magazine.

varilight
varilight

@apex_DNA By what you've said then my car is almost worthy of a feature then! Lol. One of my main points of contention is that no where did Charles or Sean mention any restoration of the Legend at all. There's no history. To me it was simply choosing an old car slapping on some old rims and accessories and Bam done. As I've said before not saying the car isn't nice, I'm just stating that compared to the other caliber of builds on SH this just doesn't stack up.

apex_DNA
apex_DNA

 @varilight  @apex_DNA When was the last time you saw a stock AE86 with decent interior on ultra rare rims? I'd rather see that than another over-the-top "because drift car".

apex_DNA
apex_DNA

 @Harry Q Allstar  @varilight  @sean klingelhoefer  @bigeastbay No, it IS a build quote on quote. Last time I've checked, restorations, rare wheels, rare accessories, and even mild modifications were still considered part of a build. I wish more people would take the time to appreciate the car for what it is (from the factory), and not what it should be by YOUR standards only.

apex_DNA
apex_DNA

 @varilight  @sean klingelhoefer  @bigeastbay  You're forgetting that this is an online publication, NOT a magazine. And even if it was featured in print, it would be totally worthy of it. You young bloods don't remember the early Sport Compact Car magazines, to even begin to appreciate "builds" like these.

apex_DNA
apex_DNA

 @varilight  @bigeastbay  Whyat, he shoulda "riced" it out like every other car you see that has "reasonable work done to it"?

sean klingelhoefer
sean klingelhoefer moderator

 @varilight  @bigeastbay It's not "essentially" a lowered old Legend on rare rims, it is a lowered old Legend on rare rims... but when's the last time you saw one of those? It's something I thought the audience would get a kick out of, but apparently some people on this site are so hardcore that they can't lighten up and have fun from time to time. Don't get me wrong, I'm all about mental builds and race cars and everything in between, but sometimes there's something pleasant about simplicity and originality - even if it is just a lowered old Legend on rare rims. 


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