The 101: A Beginner’s Guide To Wrc

I hope everyone else is as excited as I am about WRC coverage coming to Speedhunters! One of my favorite things about working for this site is getting dropped into unfamiliar territory and trying to figure out not only how to shoot a new type of event, but also trying to figure out the rules, regulations and car specifications. They say variety is the spice of life, and for me this is never more apparent than when I cover a new event for the first time!

That said, it’s not always all fun and games and with WRC I found that it is actually an extremely difficult event for a first timer. There are lots of trade secrets and tips and tricks that I discovered along the way and I ended up learning so much that I wanted to share some of my discoveries with you guys in hopes of making your first WRC experience more pleasurable.

Now of course this is only going to be a survey of one, taken by me at one rally event – so I’m by no means and expert and I’m sure not all rallies are created equal, but I’m sure much of this information should carry over to any event. I’m also hoping that some of you hardcore experienced WRC fans will also share some of your tips with the readers below in the comments section; together I hope we can create the ultimate “beginner’s guide to WRC!”

So for starters, there’s this funny looking folder that is given to all the media people. Inside it contains a lot of pertinent information about the event, including some brief car and driver specs and other miscellaneous tidbits. But there’s one thing inside here that is extremely important…

Maps! Since a rally occurs over many many miles/kilometers and the stages are very spread out, it’s critical that you have maps to tell you where to go and when to be there. In the case of Mexico, none of the stages were marked by public signboards, so it was a real task finding the stages even with the help of the maps, but without these you might as well give up.

So that’s all fine and dandy, but what if you aren’t a member of the media? Well, in that case you can purchase one of these fan guides, which actually contains even more information than the press versions. I’m not sure what these normally cost, but whatever the price, it’s unquestionably worth it.

The maps inside the fan guide are even laid out in color! If you’re attending a rally pretty much anywhere other than the city you live in, this is an absolute must-have item and it also makes a pretty cool souvenir.

There’s also more good information like this guide to rally etiquette overviewing dos and don’ts. You’d be amazed how many times #5 was broken in Mexico!

In yesterday’s story, I mentioned that a good spot for the public to get some shots of the cars is on their way out of Parc Ferme for the early morning transit. Here you can get right up next to the car and get some pretty cool shots of them on public roads.

However, if you time it just right, this is also an opportunity to stage your car ahead of the start and follow the cars in route to the next stage. If you plan it out properly you can get some pretty cool shots, like the opening image I took of Ken Block… but beware, the cars can and will make erratic movements and can prove very tricky to follow!

You’ll definitely want to expect to spend a lot of time driving to and from stages, in fact you’ll probably end up driving more than watching, but that’s just a part of rally. In some cases certain stages are ran multiple times in one day and people will often camp out in one spot, but where’s the fun in that!?

It’s probably a very good idea to get an off-road-capable rental car and FULL INSURANCE if you’re going to be venturing out into the sketchy stages. Be prepared for some extremely gnarly and dangerous roads, and also remember that however hairy the stage routes are – the access roads will be even more treacherous.

Since this was a gravel rally, there were plenty of times where visibility was cut to zero if we were following another car. If there is a whole group of cars in front of you, be prepared to slow down and add some gap if you don’t want to plummet off a cliff!

Here’s an example of just one of the roads we had to drive down to get to a good vantage  point. I shot this on day one thinking that this was pretty extreme, but by the end of the weekend I realized that this was actually one of the more civilized routes!

You can also anticipate getting to places where you might get stuck. Actually, some of the best spots I’ve found are the ones that are the hardest to get to because it eliminates all but the most determined spectators. The harder to get to, the better to be at!

On the morning of the second day we saw a grim reminder of just how dangerous these roads can be. While I missed the shot in the morning due to my camera being packed away, this photo from the return trip in the afternoon depicts the remnants of a car that rolled off the cliff and the pieces left behind after it was excavated from the hillside. Scary stuff, please be cautious!

Once you find a suitable place to park, you’ll need to be ready for some pretty sketchy hiking conditions as well. This was one of the more casual areas, hence why I could stop and shoot a frame, but you’ll definitely want to be wearing appropriate footwear suitable for being on your feet for several hours.

This is the view of a problem we encountered a lot in Mexico – returning from a stage only to find that we had been blocked in by careless spectators. All it takes is one car to block in hundreds of others, so I’d issue a warning to be prepared for this to happen and also please don’t be bone-headed enough to block in others yourself.

Sometimes you just have to be resourceful and try to figure out a solution to move cars out of your way. Where there’s a will and enough man power, there’s usually a way. Oftentimes others will come to help if they see you’re in a pickle, all part of the rally brotherhood I suppose!

Even when there isn’t anyone directly blocking you, the passageways can become pretty slim. We discovered that a Suburban is about the maximum sized car you can reasonably expect to take through rally access roads.

Seriously glad I wasn’t driving!

In retrospect, I think that the best thing to do (if you can afford the luxury) is to show up a week or so ahead of the event to scout out the stages ahead of time. This is precisely what the rally drivers do when they make their notes and refer to the process as reconnaissance or “recce” for short. The Volvos above are vehicles supplied by M-Sport for the Ford drivers to do their runs in and are equipped with hydraulic hand brakes, rally tires and bucket seats. Too cool.

If all else fails, you can always regroup and intercept the cars at service and/or Parc Ferme. At various points throughout the rally and at the beginning and end of each day, the cars can be found here.

Parc Ferme is French for “closed park” and this is where the cars must be stored and guarded when they aren’t either running a stage or being serviced. While the cars are stored here they cannot be worked on or even touched by anyone. If this rule is broken, even by a drunken spectator jumping the fence, the driver(s) whose car(s) were affected will be penalized.

The service bays are another area where spectators can get up close to the cars and drivers, but it’s a bit of a madhouse! If you want a shot at getting close to the action you really need to arrive at least thirty-minutes or more before the cars start coming in.

Once opened up in the service bay, it becomes even more apparent what a staggering piece of equipment the modern rally car has become. Obviously what they are capable of doing out on the stages is phenomenal, but how they’re designed to be torn down and put back together so rapidly is an engineering feat all its own.

Depending on a number of factors which I don’t fully understand (probably length of stages etc) the cars are given a set amount of time for repairs that varies between 30-45 minutes. In this amount of time, most of us would be lucky to get much done at all, but these guys can change everything from engines and gearboxes to entire body panels and all four corners of footwork in those precious minutes.

In addition to having a state-of-the-art-modular-car, it also takes lots of practice and a very organized work space to make massive repairs in such a short amount of time. Here we see one of the most anal-retentive of service bays belonging to, surprise, the Germans from Volkswagen.

Everything is cleaned and prepped, patiently awaiting the car’s arrival. After the service is hustled through, all the damaged pieces are discarded, the workspace and tools cleaned and everything goes back in its place to be used again in the future.

But to be honest, every workspace is amazingly well organized. Since I was embedded with the M-Sport operation for this rally I got a pretty good look behind the scenes and I have to admit that even as a former mechanic, the logistics behind servicing this many cars and moving that many parts and tools all around the world makes my brain hurt!

In most forms of racing you’ll often hear drivers crediting a win to their crew team, but I don’t think this could ever be more evident than in rally. Sure, they’re not doing pitstops in 2.5 seconds like in Formula One, but they’re also changing out half a car at a time, not just four tires!

The amount of spares required to do racing this brutal is almost hysterical. In virtually all forms of racing you’d expect to require at least four spares for any given part over the course of a weekend, but in rally I’d imagine you’ll need twice that or better.

Container after container is carrying spare everything, shocks, clutches, gear sets, differentials, body panels, brakes and more. It’s almost unfathomable how many components are on hand.

Then once the event is over, the parts are all examined and the good pieces get packed back up while the rest are literally thrown away. At one point I was discarding an empty water bottle and saw a throttle body that must have been worth several hundred dollars in the same garbage can. Mental.

Something else that stuck me as being quite unique to rally is the camaraderie amongst all the drivers and co-drivers. It almost seemed more like they were all participating in a non-competitive sport with a vibe similar to that of childhood skate sessions I used to have with my friends.

Perhaps this is due to the non-wheel-to-wheel nature of rally, but it was really cool seeing everyone hanging out and chatting pretty much anytime the cars were at rest. I would guess they aren’t exactly sharing pace notes or giving away secrets to stages, but nevertheless, I’ve can’t recall having seen this much interaction between competitors in world-class racing.

I guess in a way it probably helps pass the time too, since there does seem to be a lot of standing around and waiting involved in rally. It was actually pretty neat getting to talk with some of the drivers like Ken Block between stages over the course of the weekend, something I’ll discuss a little more tomorrow. It’s definitely a very different atmosphere compared to the other forms of motorsport I’m accustomed to and something I look forward to investigating further.

But as cliche as it might sound, if I had to pick a favorite component of WRC Leon it would have to be the human experience. I’ve never before been so blown away by the fans at an event as I was down in Mexico. These are good people who are genuinely excited and passionate about motorsport and also some of the kindest and most grateful I’ve ever met.

I cannot believe that some of these people would make the same dangerous trek we made to come out and see a few cars running down a gravel trail. But they do it with a smile and bring their whole family, enjoying motorsport as it should be. There were numerous occasions where I would make my way down to a stage and have people, like the family seen here, offering me food and drink.

I know it might sound a little crazy, but that weekend in Mexico restored some of my faith in humanity. It was really charming to return to a place where people are going to see motorsport for pure enjoyment, not to show off how much money they have by purchasing a VIP box suite over start/finish and spending the entire weekend on their phone. These are real motorsport fans.

It’s around people like these that I feel the most alive. For the first time in a long while I felt like a kid again, completely overcome by the sense of wonderment. If this is how most rallies are, I cannot wait to go back and see another. If you’re like me and you’ve been putting off going to see a WRC event until now, I can’t encourage you enough to go out and see it in person. It will change your life. I guarantee it.

WRC Leon coverage on Speedhunters

More Rally coverage on Speedhunters

More stories by Sean Klingelhoefer on Speedhunters

-Sean


Tags: , , , , , , , , , ,


46 comments
MikeDeHigh
MikeDeHigh

'Oftentimes others will come to help if they see you’re in a pickle, all part of the rally brotherhood I suppose!'

That's one of the reasons we love rally so much, and what you said about it being so accesible for the fans, that's so true! Often you can get a chance to chat with the drivers. 

We've visited WRC in Germany, Spain, Greece and Sardegna (Italy) and everywhere we go it's great to see how friendly the people are and for us one part of the fun of WRC (or Rally in general) is the driving to the stages. We usually rent a small car like a Ford Fiesta and once we even had a Nissan Micra (in gravel Greece ;)) The fact that these cars are small and agile really helps us with driving to the rally.. But indeed.. always with full assurance! :) 


You already said it, we really recommend coming a few days before the rally starts so you can already do your own recce. In countries like Greece you're often driving on gravelroads that your GPS won't see as a road, so we usually put several GPS-points towards a cool photospot and drive from point a to b etc etc. ;) 


And.. Speed_Kiwi said the following: "It's most likely your girlfriend wouldn't understand the appeal of getting up early in the cold and dark, driving for an hour or two to some remote gravel road in the middle of bumf*ck nowhere," 

That's so funny to us.... My boyfriend is still very gratefull that I LOVE rallying just as much as him and I'm personally very happy to see more and more females in the rally.. Guess that's a typical girls-thing..? ;) 


Great post and great fun to read it! Hope you have had the pleasure of visiting more rally's since this post, cause it's just the most amazing motorsport around! :)

yanesnyawai
yanesnyawai

I think you snatched the throttle body and now trying to put it on Leroy right? XD

JMoore
JMoore

Imagine that. What was most likely CAD designed throttle body that is probably worth hundreds or thousands is just tossed into the trash like a piece of paper. You should have snagged it.

chiwag
chiwag

very good story, glad you met mexico and I like what people think. I'm from chihuahua mexico and have the door open to come anytime. in this April will be held here in the Chihuahua Express rally will leave the link for you to check (http://www.chihuahuaexpress.com/invitation2013.asp) and take advantage to see a bit of culture and level Chihuahua told in motorsport.

SaulPorrasAranda
SaulPorrasAranda

http://www.rallymexico.com/site/en that page is very helpfull. You can get the google maps files for every stage. Get a pdf map files and a lot of resources. You do not have to rent a car there are buses that take you to some stages in the morning and they take you back to poliforum. You migth say how can a bus make it to the hills? Well there are special roads for them that no one else can transit to avoid traffic is cheap and really simple. Those buses can also take you to the super special stage and take you to guanajuato's starting ceremony. Just come and stay in an hotel close to poliforum and get on the bus. Sean i'll be happy to give you information next year so you can make a gide for all the readers. Awesome coverage.

Pwain
Pwain

Sometimes, I feel the racing loses validity when the team has 20 spares of everything. I remember a Le Mans where Audi crashed and replaced literally the whole back end of a car. How in the freaking world is that endurance? Instead of bringing 8 bumpers, make one that won't break, even in the WRC race conditions. If they did that, that would be some seriously useful trickle-down technology. Imagine that bumper instead of current ones. You'd never need to worry about a fender-bender again. Now imagine that for the whole car.  

PhilippUlrich
PhilippUlrich

I'm hopefully going to see my first WRC event this year here in Germany. Thankfully it's pretty much the opposite of Mexico in terms of accessibility. The ADAC will setup wheelchair spaces at every single stage, so disabled people like me get to experience awesome Rallye action, too! :-)

P_Joel
P_Joel

Once again, congratulations for the photos! You have really caught the essence of the rally experience. For us, fans of the roaring sounds and dust/rocks/snow/tarmac hooning, it's pretty much like that, and every single event we assist we allways make plans for the next event to be more complete, so that us can quinch ourselves with motorsport action. With that said, i suport your idea and let's all create the ultimate “beginner’s guide to WRC!”

 

Awesome work!

adasdadadad
adasdadadad

que buenas fotos, deberias de estar en la carrera panamericana asi conoserias toda la republica

Counterdoc
Counterdoc

What a great story Sean! I started rallying by myself this year and all I can say is that you can find the camaraderie at every rally event all over the world. Even if you are new to the scene and don't know the other competitors, they just come over to you and start talking. IMO thats the way motorsport should be like!

Can't wait to see some more coverage from other rally events!

 

Greetings from Germany,

Marius

reno808
reno808

Thats pretty cool. Very informative. You made me felt as if i was there with you. THANKS!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

roeby
roeby

These are well over due posts, some great shots Sean. Did you liberty the throttle body? That would have the pride of place on my garage shelf. And also, thats a nice ass You have there Sean!

pha1053
pha1053

precisa de wrc no Brasil

pelo menos o xgames vai vir

RBJKT
RBJKT moderator

Great read mate. Sounds awesomely cool

Pandasex
Pandasex

 @sean klingelhoefer  thats one badass picture at the end and as always a great read im glad mexico gave you its open arms as it always does 

Jason Hardy
Jason Hardy

excellent post, WRC is struggling at the moment but its great to see the fans still turning out.

RensAdams
RensAdams

Have you experienced the kindness of the marshals as well? When I attended the WRC in Strasbourg/ Hagenau I was amazed that without media access they still tell you where and when to cross the track and where it's best to get great shots. I've never heard of the parc ferme rules though. It's quite a severe rule... Do you have any idea what the penalty is for the car/driver when something happens? 

 

mariopereira
mariopereira

Again, thanks fro bringing Rally to SH. I already follow SH because of everything else car related, but now, with my favourite car genre, rally, i get ecen more pleasure landing in this website.

tbtstt
tbtstt

Another great article and some great pointers in the comments already. As Speed_Kiwi said, its one of those things that people either do or don't get. To some, the idea of standing in the middle of nowhere (often in the cold!), to see a car flash by is an alien concept when you could stand by a track and see the same cars many times over! Just a few seconds of a talented driver on the limit on the gravel is often more exciting than a whole day watching a driver on track!My top tip for anyone spectating rally, be it WRC or any other series, is engage your brain when choosing your vantage point. I've lost count of the number of times I've seen people nearly wiped out or get badly pelted by rocks standing somewhere stupid! (Having that, some of my fave rally memories have involved getting hit by bits of the stage!)

koko san
koko san

Enjoying this WRC coverage a lot, this "behind the scenes"/beginners guide and all the comments give a very different view, normally I follow WRC on ESPN which is very correct and dull at times.

Aaron48
Aaron48

refreshing post is right!i am enjoying your work Sean!!!!!! keep it coming!

JDMized
JDMized

What a refreshing post. Keep up the awesome work Sean, looking forward for more coverage!

greenroadster
greenroadster

Amazing stuff WRC...and also the coverage. Good job man

Chuy Mtz.
Chuy Mtz.

I would have loved to have seen a Speedhunters sticker on that Burro'. While in Leon you should also visit their famous momias' (mummys). The ground there has a weird chemical that mumifies them. The more you know ;)

bigjoe
bigjoe

That's what rallying is all about across the world Sean....fun, relaxation and excitement for the spectators. You mentioned one of the biggest things about rallying; the traveling to and from the different stages. That's why people love rallying, since you're not confined to a seat for hours on end.

KeithCharvonia
KeithCharvonia

Those work bays are awesome!  Think of the organization and presence of mind it must take to work on a car so quickly and efficiently.

Corbin
Corbin

Great article Sean! Loved the vibe and the atmosphere you've captured. On a totally different note how many supreme hats do you have? I see you have already dipped into the 2013 s/s collection.

K's
K's

I'm enjoying these wrc articles, very good work capturing the atmosfere(?) with great photos

Rowdy
Rowdy

Just packing up  and going to any WRC event is not for the leisure traveler. It's best described as early mornings, late nights, 3 hour drives to the middle of nowhere, camping, driving 3 hours more, camping and then more driving rinse repeat for 3 days. Doing more than 2 stages or 2 stages a service park  or start/finish ceremony per day and you are simply going to wear yourself out and not enjoy yourself. I'm in no way affiliated with any team, but I have been to 9 Swedish, 3 German, 1 Wales, 2 Finnish over the past 10 years in total spectator capacity.  Google Earth is great. There are websites (PlanetMarcus) that produce .kmz overlays and access roads that are better than the spectator guides or local topographic maps. Spectator guides intentionally don't list local shortcut back roads as it means more places to patrol for organizers.  Download to your laptop as mobile service is sketchy and expensive. MRE's in a backpack with bottles of water and a foldable tripod stool work well. Planning your arrival and departure from traffic bottle neck points is key. Ask the locals. In Finland around Jyvaskyla, plenty of bottlenecks. In and around Hagfors Sweden, lots of backups. Germany's autobahn? No problem. Rent a cottage near a stage area and don't stay in a park ferme hotel. You can beat the crowds this way. Park your car to get out  of a stage when you're done, not to get close to the stage at the start. If you can um, "score" a marshal's jersey and act like you are in some kind of authority, that will get you places. If you can get some sort of manufacturer VIP pass *ahem* if you have friends in the right places, that goes a long ways too. Get your sleep in, eat well, dress for the weather. I'd recommend Germany as a good first timer rally. Small crows, generally fair weather, clean, easy of navigation and access to stages. If you want to get a tastes stateside, stage-chasing at Rally America is remarkably comparable. Rallying is great because of the key element found here in this article that is not found in other forms of motorsport: Accessibility to the stars!

AmirIzham
AmirIzham

glad that you mentioned the importance of the crews. to us rallyist, our crews are truly the unsung heros over any given rally weekend, that's why we always try to give credit to them whenever we can.

JoaoMarques
JoaoMarques

Hi thats a very good guide for WRC i was wondering if you come to Portugal next month and do the same?

 

Speed_Kiwi
Speed_Kiwi

Enjoying the WRC coverage and photos Sean, keep it coming! I gotta rep my fellow countryman though and mention that Brad's WRC Rally New Zealand photos and posts last year were pretty sweet.

 

Rally spectating is one of those things that you either "get" or you don't. It's most likely your girlfriend wouldn't understand the appeal of getting up early in the cold and dark, driving for an hour or two to some remote gravel road in the middle of bumf*ck nowhere, buying a spectator pass then trudging through the forest, through mud and over fences to stand with a bunch of Japanese tourists and get a 7-second glimpse of some blonde Finnish kid putting 30cm of clean country air under the Michelins of his French hatchback. And doing it for three days straight.

 

I can remember getting smacked in the back of the head by a big rock spat out by the spinning rear wheels of Tommi Makinen's Marlboro Evo VI on Rally NZ in '99. It hurt for a while, but it was so worth it. I love rallying and get my fix whenever I can.

 

One more tip for beginners: if you can't get a media pass, rally organisers are often looking for volunteers to act as marshalls or in timing crews during rally events. Volunteering to help before the event is often a great way to get close to the action without having to go as a paying spectator.     

sean klingelhoefer
sean klingelhoefer moderator

 @Corbin  Thanks man! And I've got way too many, I keep hoping that one day they'll break down and decide to sponsor me :P

Marco Maas
Marco Maas

I second that, never try to get to the start of a stage. It's useless and you will 100% not get there in time. I always try to not follow the big traffic. You need good maps and a lot of coordination skills to get to the middle sections of a stage without getting stuck in traffic. It is so totally different than going to the racetrack. But at the same time very awesome!    Sean, great coverage.

sean klingelhoefer
sean klingelhoefer moderator

 @JoaoMarques I wish man, if it were up to me I'd go to every event, but unfortunately I don't think it's possible. I'm hoping to maybe to Germany and Finland - but event those I'm not so sure about. 

sean klingelhoefer
sean klingelhoefer moderator

 @Speed_Kiwi Very true, Brad did a great job! It's sad that there has been this long of a gap in coverage, but it's difficult for Speedhunters to get out to the events. I just hope that we can try to have some sort of regularity in our coverage in the future. 

 

I love your summarization of what rally is, quite comical yet very true lol. Also very good point about volunteering, I still want to try to do an official "corner marshal appreciation" post - without them none of this would be possible. 

Sneaky Squirrel
Sneaky Squirrel

If you're going to only one rally, then it has to be Finland. Fastest rally on the calendar, HUGE jumps and some of the most knowledgeable, passionate fans anywhere.

JoaoMarques
JoaoMarques

 @sean klingelhoefer Im glad that you mentioned the crowd on WRC, you go to see a rally event an suddenly you make new friends its really mind blowing.

 


OFFICIAL SPEEDHUNTERS SUPPLIERS