Eagle Field : The Home Of Drag Strip Rebels

I’ve been trying to pinpoint what exactly it is that makes the Eagle Field Drags so great, and I think I may have figured it out.

Whether you are talking about a street legal car or a Top Fueler at the NHRA Winternationals, drag racing is a numbers game. It’s about reaction times, 60 foot times, trap speeds, and of course the all-important ET.

At Eagle Field it’s different.

The numbers are completely stripped away while the spirit and fun of vintage drag racing takes center stage. The biggest competition you’ll find is the one to get the crowd excited.

Even with no prize money or sponsorship at stake, racers bring their cars from great distances to have fun alongside like-minded purveyors of vintage drag racing style.

As I’ve mentioned before, Eagle Field is to drag racing what All Star Bash is to drifting.  There’s a reason so many people show up a hot, dusty airfield in the middle of nowhere.

Robbie Davis’ Willys Gasser is another one of the cars that made the trip down from the Pacific Northwest.

Apparently the last time this car saw a drag strip was back in 1967, and it very much looks the part.

Hand lettering > vinyl graphics.

The flathead-powered Cotton Chopper represents the early style homebuilt dragster in its purest form.

It has all the creature comforts you could possibly ask for, and how about that steering wheel position?

The Cotton Chopper was representing the Valve Burners out of the nearby city of Merced.

A fat-tired Road Runner squares off against a second generation Camaro in a Mopar vs. Chevy battle down the strip.

’64 Fairlane with the nose about as high as it will go. Red-tinted windows are a cool touch as well.

The wicked pair of drag roadsters from UFO Racing ready for action.

Bob Riedel’s Hemi-powered Plymouth out of Reno, Nevada is another one of the Eagle Field regulars.

You will find the strangest things while wandering the pits at an event like the Eagle Field Drags. I’m not quite sure what this thing is…

…but it did have flathead power.

Is it a dragster, an off-road vehicle, or maybe just the world’s coolest golf cart?

AMC Gremlin. The chances of seeing one of these on the street are extremely low, but they do pop up at the drags more often. The same goes for other American compacts from the ’70s like the Chevy Vega and the Ford Pinto.

This airbagged Caddy didn’t look like it was suited for the drags, but that didn’t stop it from laying down some serious rubber.

Henry J vs. Willys. Two bitchin’ Gassers from long defunct nameplates going heads up. This is why Eagle Field is awesome.

I was surprised to see this little Volkswagen out there mixing it up with the V8s.

It got down the track pretty well thanks to its turbo power, despite some nasty looking wheel hop.

The ’64 Fairlane comes off the line hard. On a normal dragstrip a car like this might lift the front wheels at launch, but it’s not likely at Eagle Field with its lack of traction.

The Morris Minor is another one of those lightweight import cars that became prime drag car material beginning in the ’60s. It may as well be a scaled down Willys.

A real Willys for comparison’s sake. This one was engaged in a grudge match with Riedel’s Plymouth.

Event organizer Rocky Phillips was out with his twin-engined dragster, but an unfortunate transmission issue would keep the car sidelined.

The Leggin’ It Barracuda ready to pounce at the start line.

It’s strange that two Plymouths built about 30 years apart could both look so natural together in this drag strip habitat.

Steve McCann’s blown ’49 Anglia delivery van.  It’s scary in a good way.

With that I’ll wrap up my look at Saturday’s Eagle Field drag meet.

I’ll also be releasing some desktops of course, so if you have any requests leave a comment below.

-Mike Garrett

2012 Eagle Field Drags Pt.1

More Stories by Mike Garrett


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17 comments
Rü$╫
Rü$╫

That gremlin is not only just a gremlin its a gremlin x they came from the factory with a 304ci aka 5.0L V8.  More pictures of the morris minor please if you have them! 

chrischabre
chrischabre

the flathead powered "golf cart" is actually a dune buggy. They got popular in the late 50s early 60's...I believe those are actually airplane tires...

BlackJacket
BlackJacket

black & white fairlane desktop please 

tanksnr
tanksnr

These guys have played too much Carmageddon...I like it!

u531355
u531355

the wierd lil flathead powered golf cart thing was a way of being able to race in a diff class. by having front and rear suspension they would slap you in with some of the streetcars instead of with the full on digger fed's. you could be more competitive with a lighter car and not spends as much.

flatteblack
flatteblack

Feature on a Henry J would be awesome! Either custom or stock is fine :P

guthriez
guthriez

More of the Anglia, por favor!

Brad
Brad

Would love to see some Chevy C-10 pick ups!!!

CraigS
CraigS

 @u531355 Looks more like what guys would build in the early day for playing in the dunes. That would be why it's running implement tires all the way around and why the motor and seat sits so far back in the chassis

u531355
u531355

 @CraigS  @u531355 did not know that, im not from around the west coast so i wouldnt have thought about it. i know that if you have a solid mounted rear axle they lump you in with all the fed's so alot of guys would keep rear suspension to be in the slower classes and not have to have as big of a cage and such

Mike Garrett
Mike Garrett moderator

 @u531355  @CraigS Whatever it was. It sure was strange. The tires looked aircraft tires - something you'd see on an old WW2 era bomber maybe.


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