Temple Of Speed: Let’s Daikoku!

I’ve got a little confession to make here. Over the last several years I’ve had the chance to witness a great amount of Japanese car culture – the legendary race tracks, shops of all sizes, events big and small, museums, mountain roads and more. Surprisingly though, one thing missing from that list was a visit to one of Japan’s most well known car spots – Daikoku Parking Area.

How could I have missed out on Daikoku for so long? A few reasons actually. When I lived in Japan back in 2008-09 I was based in Ibaraki and never had the chance to drive out to Yokohama and check it out. On subsequent visits to Japan, I was often without a car – and unlike many places in Japan, Daikoku is not easily accessed via public transportation.

Finally though on my most recent trip I was able to experience Daikoku Parking Area for myself. Not just once, but on a pair of occasions. This is all thanks to my friend and fellow auto otaku KAGE-san, who provided both his red Toyota 86 and his local expertise on a couple of my shooting expeditions. When he found out that I had yet to visit Daikoku, he insisted that we check out. No complaints were raised.

Now Dino has covered Daikoku’s famous meets countless times here on Speedhunters, but since this was my first time visiting I thought I’d post some impressions and observations on this magical place in a Temple of Speed story.

Wait a minute? A “Temple of Speed” story about a place that’s pretty much a fancy parking lot? Don’t cars stand still in parking lots? Sure they do, but for car lovers this just might be the world’s best parking lot.

If that’s not enough to justify its place as a Temple of Speed, Daikoku PA also happens to be connected to the Wangan Line – a highway route known the world over as a playground for ridiculously fast machines and legendary Japanese tuners. Daikoku happens to be the place where you’ll find them warming up and cooling down.

Before I go on though, I figured I should briefly describe the parking area and it’s location for those that might not be familiar.

Daikoku Futo itself is a man-made island that sits in the middle of Yokohama Harbor, with the parking area only taking up a small part of its area. The rest is filled with warehouses, container terminals, and loading facilities for vehicles being exported from Japan. In fact, there’s a chance YOUR Japanese car may have departed from Daikoku Futo before making its way to distant shores.

Zooming in closer on the Google satellite image, you can see Daikoku PA itself nestled beneath the towering highway overpasses. Primary access comes via the aforementioned Wangan Route. To the east it’s an arrow straight shot across the industrial harbor landscape toward Haneda Airport and on to Tokyo beyond. To the west, it’s a short trip across the Bay Bridge into the heart of Yokohama.

Even if you completely ignore the cars, Daikoku is a fascinating place. There have been books published on the architectural aesthetics of Japan’s highway interchanges, and the maze of routes and ramps that circle Daikoku is one of the most impressive in the country.

Just heading off the highway and down the off-ramp to the parking area is rather enjoyable in itself, with a long perfectly circular route down to ground level. I’m also told you can tell which cars are for real or not when you hear their exhaust notes coming down from the highway.

From here you can also find some very nice views of the nearby Minato Mirai skyline and the Yokohama Bay Bridge…

Of course Daikoku Parking Area is much more than just a gathering sport for gearheads. It’s also an extremely busy stopover point for highway travelers passing through the area. I’ll discuss some of these roadside amenities in just a moment.

As with everything in Japan, there’s a certain sense of order and politeness at Daikoku. The people that come to hang out and talk cars stick to the peripheral areas of the parking lot, leaving plenty of space for the normal people that are just passing through to grab a bite or use the restroom.

In addition, there’s a separate area for highway buses and truckers – some of whom are passing through on long hauls across country, while others are serving the local harbor area.

While there’s activity at Daikoku 24-7, weekends are the most popular times for car people. From what I’ve been told, Saturday nights usually get broken up pretty quickly by police, so Fridays and Sundays are the preferred days for most people.

Before I share some of the interesting machinery I found in my visits to Daikoku, I thought we should also take a look at some of the amenities offered to both highway travelers and the enthusiasts who gather here.

I know this will vary depending on which part of the world you come from, but here in the USA roadside rest areas typically have some bathrooms, a vending machine or two and that’s about it. You really don’t want to spend any more time at one than you absolutely need to.

Japan’s take on the roadside rest area couldn’t be more different. In fact, some of these highway parking areas (Daikoku included) are almost worthy of being destinations in themselves.

To put it another way, the feeling is more “mall” than it is “rest stop”.

Take a look at this photo and you might think you were in a department store somewhere in the middle of Tokyo. Nope, this is the “gift shop” at a highway parking area!

Again, I’m not exactly sure what the roadside amenities are like in other countries, but as an American it’s hard to even imagine something like this…

Hungry? There are a few different restaurants to choose from at Daikoku.

Like a lot of Japan’s parking areas, the store at here is stocked with lots of specialty items and local cuisine from surrounding areas. The idea is you pick up this stuff as omiyage (souvenirs) for your friends and family back home.

Here are some goodies from Yokohama’s famous Chinatown, which is located just across the Bay Bridge.

On the upper floor is a nice little cafe with the plenty of room to sit down and relax. What’s better after a cold night of looking at cars than a nice hot cup of cappuccino or tea?

Nope, that’s surely not your typical roadside cuisine…

Double cheeseburger anyone?

For those who are in a hurry, there’s also an enormous vending machine area. I’m sure anyone who’s familiar with Japan knows that they don’t mess around when it comes vending machines.

Besides every beverage imaginable, there also machines that sell hot food. In the mood for some Taiyaki, Onigiri, or Yakisoba? 350 yen and you’re covered.

Back outside now, you may have noticed the giant tower that rises up from the middle of parking lot. I was wondering exactly what this was, but it turns out it’s just a big light tower. I was thinking it was some sort of high tech control room or something.

Whatever the case, it just adds another sc-ifi touch to what’s already a fairly “Blade Runner” looking environment…

I really don’t even know where to begin with the cars of Daikoku. Perhaps the coolest thing is the variety of machines you see rolling in and out. VIP, drift, classic, import, exotic, dress-up – Daikoku is a gathering point for them all.

As an example, you’ll see a humble little Eunos Roadster…

…parked steps away from an EF Civic sedan Lowrider.

The evenings I visited had a particularly strong turnout of vintage machinery, like this beautiful C130 Butaketsu Nissan Laurel.

Imported cars are almost as common as their domestic rivals at Daikoku. Here’s a Renault Clio V6 I happened across.

I also spotted small group of C4 Corvettes, including this tough looking drop top fitted with a set of Work VS-KFs.

While some come to Daikoku alone, it’s also very popular as a gathering spot for car clubs and owners groups.

One evening a group of street style Chasers, Mark IIs, and Crestas had gathered up for an informal hang out session.

On another day, a sizable crowd of Z20 Toyota Soarers were lined up in a throwback to the boxy cars of the late Showa period.

Parked a short distance away from the line of Z20s was an earlier Z10 model looking just right on SSR Mk.IIIs.

Of course you don’t have to always have to drive the same exact car as your buddies. One group of guys I met came out with an S30 Fairlady Z, a Hakosuka Skyline…

…and this completely original SA22C RX-7 that was in showroom fresh condition.

Another Showa throwback with the largely unseen Z31 variant of the Fairlady Z…

An interesting look for this V35 Skyline Coupe. Again, the variety of the cars you see at Daikoku is unbelievable.

The most memorable machine I saw during my time at the parking area had to be this red KPGC10 Skyline GT-R. Not only was it a stunningly beautiful example of the rare Hakosuka GT-R, but it was also rolling around on full racing slicks.

Any doubt of the car’s legitimacy was quickly erased upon hearing the sound of its S20 scream it jumped back onto the Wangan. Yup, reason number 4,267,325 why Japan is the coolest place in the world.

Needless to say, I quickly found out why Daikoku Parking Area is such a legendary spot. More than anything though, I realized that Daikoku is everything that’s great about Japanese car culture concentrated into a single place.

To put it another way, to visit Daikoku is to see most amazing automobiles under the most casual of circumstances…

The cars are fantastic, the people are friendly, the vibe is relaxed, and the atmosphere is second to none. There’s even great food. What more do you need?

If you have the chance to visit Japan, I highly recommend hailing a cab, begging a friend for a ride, or just plain doing whatever it takes to see Daikoku for yourself.

-Mike


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87 comments
Chris
Chris

Hi, iam in shinjuku and i want to go to daikoku PA in public transportation. But it,s possible or very hard to find hit?thanks in advance Chris.

will0208
will0208

Incredible place for Japanese car culture.

I had thought about visiting Daikoku for the cars during a coming trip, however I was wondering if it would have worth the car rental, all the mess up for going...

No need to tell that I WILL go! Thanks for the report amazing cars in an amazing report.

LouisSoon
LouisSoon

Hailing a cab to head down is one thing... I think the problem is trying to get a cab for the return trip!

koko san
koko san

Good to see Daikoku from a different perspective, after seeing it on so many posts I would have never imagined the surroundings being like that. Definitely a place I want to see if I visit Japan again.

Great article thx.

JDMToTheDeathOfMe
JDMToTheDeathOfMe

Japan is the coolest place you can ever visit if you love cars, i lived there for eight years as a teen and i fell in love with the cars haha ive been to the rest stop in the picture and there are sick cars there everyday

Steffan Maus
Steffan Maus

Awesome post. One day I will visit with a car :) Thank you for sharing..

FunctionFirst
FunctionFirst

Nice coverage Mike, it's nice to see the areas outside of the parking area as well as the amenities. We've seen lots of car club coverage, but I don't think I've been able to see the 'whole picture'. Very cool. From most coverage I read and see I feel I'd want to be semi-fluent in Japanese, or at least able to read it, before I visited in earnest or without a guide - would you say that's fairly accurate?

noseflip1
noseflip1

Is it possible that we could get a descop-version of the 2-nd last picture? The one inlcuding the; SA22C RX-7, S30 Fairlady Z and the Hakosuka Skyline…

Thanks.

Kitch
Kitch

Awesome write-up.  I've seen loads of coverage on Daikoku before but seeing other stuff besides cars is really cool.

 

Services/rest stops in mainland Europe are pretty good, France especially has some really nice ones with nice places to eat.  No car culture though, at least not in the ones I've been in.  The UK on the other hand has a few nice ones, but the rest are horrid - proper grimey places where you wouldn't want to set foot....not unlike the rest of the UK

tbkceylon
tbkceylon

I could live in that car park...

Davide Prata
Davide Prata

Daikoku is definitely on top of my list of "things I need to see in Japan". Great coverage Mike!

 

BTW: I'm sure that if I'll go to Japan I won't have a car there. Is it really that hard to get there by public transport? Are there any Taxis that could bring you back to the city at Daikoku?

aussieANON
aussieANON

holy shit, a C10 GT-R just chilling in a parking lot!

It's really nice to know that it's being driven rather than locked in a shed as an investment.

 

ryanproulx94
ryanproulx94

That's it, I'm moving to Japan, I can't stand just drooling over this porn, I need to live it.

iamnotemonster
iamnotemonster

Daikoku was on my must visit list but I will be carless and in Osaka for most of my next visit so I will have to wait but I always love seeing posts about it and the other PAs! Thanks to you, Dino and the rest of the SH crew for bringing so much awesome coverage. I'm also kind of in love with the ITR behind the red 86.

Corbin
Corbin

Love the coverage even tho is not up to JDMized specs, but whatever. I really hate vettes but that red one on those Works is awesome. Only in Japan I guess.

BasedHero
BasedHero

I am in love with the Z31 and the 280ZX

AndrewCinch
AndrewCinch

I can speak for Canada in saying that there's no such thing as rest stops up here. Any rest stop that you encounter along the TransCanada would be the next town that you hit. And if you really need to go… There's nothing like a quick stop on the side of the road to relieve yourself! I can attest to having to do that a few times. When I made my journey through the US it was kind of shocking to me that there was even rest stops at all along the highways. So yeah, to me, Japan's rest stops are basically a small town's mall.

 

Japan is my number one place to visit for both experiencing the car culture there, and to go skiing in Hokkaido. I think I might explode with giddiness if I ever visited Daikoku!

Masterwana
Masterwana

Here in Germany the Roadstops at the Autobahn are pretty much the same as in Japan i guess.

sean klingelhoefer
sean klingelhoefer moderator

More like a Temple of Stop if you ask me... waka waka. 

BenD
BenD

Is it legal to roll on slick in Japan ? I'm from France and it isn't here ,cool to see a clio v6 here it is very rare in France and must be even rarer in Japan.

KRaZyAmmo
KRaZyAmmo

I need to make another trip back to Japan and go to Daikoku Futo. This article was fantastic!

TylerS13
TylerS13

love that corvette on works, any more on it?

Schmuppes
Schmuppes

The guy with the pristine RX-7 should be awarded a medal for keeping the car in that condition.

LouisSoon
LouisSoon

Oh yes, any more pics of that S130 Fairlady? it looks awesome!

Mike Garrett
Mike Garrett moderator

 @FunctionFirst Yeah that's what I was going for - mostly because I was curious myself! As for visiting, if you stick to big cities there's plenty of cool stuff to see even with little or no knowledge of the language. It gets a little tougher once you get outside the city - especially in terms of transportation.

Mike Garrett
Mike Garrett moderator

 @Davide Prata Thanks! I'm sure it's possible to use a taxi, but you'd probably want to arrange it in advance just to be sure.

Mike Garrett
Mike Garrett moderator

@aussieANON Amazingly, there were two KPGC10s. If you look close, you'll see the one in the intro shot and the one later in the story are actually two different cars.

Mike Garrett
Mike Garrett moderator

@ryanproulx94 I know what you mean. There are lots of times when I feel like I wanna move back.

Mike Garrett
Mike Garrett moderator

 @Masterwana Hmm. Somehow that doesn't surprise me. We need to get with the program in the USA!

Masterwana
Masterwana

And to the people that hat engouh of Daikoku, just don´t read it!

roryfjohnston
roryfjohnston

Kinda like how you aren't allowed to use normal tires on certain snowy highways here.  How the authorities know whether or not you are using snow tires is beyond me but my wife insists that we stick to the law....  I am sure the same goes for using slicks:) As for the Clio, I have only seen one in the flesh here but my friend has exported a surprising number of them.  Japan has an excess of EVERYTHING when it comes to cars.

Mike Garrett
Mike Garrett moderator

I'm not sure if it's legal anywhere. How strictly its enforced is another matter entirely though...

PhilipRiegert
PhilipRiegert

%s Trying to time it right with Tokyo Auto Salon %s !!

MarkPalmer
MarkPalmer

 @roryfjohnston  @iamnotemonster HI Rory, Sorry to stick my nose in here but i am coming to Japan this weekend from Aus and am wondering if you know of any car meets going on this weekend in Osaka?

 

Taylor
Taylor

 @Mike Garrett  @AndrewCinch Andrew doesn't really know what he's talking about. Canada has rest stops just nothing comparable to Daikoku.

 

I can't post my wikipedia link but search "rest area" and then look under Canada.

Lille Buller
Lille Buller

 @roryfjohnston

 About the snow tires the trick could be in the:

If you crash, the see your non snow tires and the insurence will have your but on a stick for lunch..

roryfjohnston
roryfjohnston

 @MarkPalmer  @iamnotemonster There is a CRZ meeting but I doubt many tuned cars will be there.  This weekend the Kobe Autobacs is having a car event where a bunch of tuners will have booths and show off their cars.   I see a bunch of smaller car clubs will have meetings before going to it.  And, they MUST be a meeting on 7/7 for RX7s but I can't find anything yet.

 

AndrewCinch
AndrewCinch

 @Mike Garrett okay I apologize, I was probably being a little inaccurate. My experiences with Canadian highways only expand across the prairies, and the only rest stop I've encountered was one in Minnedosa along TransCanada Highway 16 in Manitoba. Still, compared to the US, with which I've seen a rest stop every 60 miles or so, there certainly aren't as many.


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