Enjoying The Scenery At 11,600rpm
The Ultimate Engine

The cover image above isn’t anything particular special to look at, right?

Sure, Toyota’s ZN6 is a great looking car, and as anyone that has driven one on the tight and twisties can tell you – ripping around quiet ocean-side roads like this one is a guaranteed good time. But is it Speedhunters worthy? The ZN6’s ability to put a smile on anyone’s face during a spirited drive isn’t exactly news, after all.

Synergy V8 19

As much as I love pedaling these cars, no, it certainly wouldn’t be worthy of a Speedhunters ‘Dream Drive’ feature if it wasn’t for this sticker adorning the factory (what, no Rocket Bunny!?) rear fenders. This not only makes it worthy of this site, but is enough to get me straight on the phone to see how I could possibly get my hands on the car for a decent test drive.

Synergy V8 41

It all started mid-2015, when Dino caught wind of JUN’s latest demo car: a ZN6 powered by an absolutely beautiful high-revving Synergy V8. Being a Kiwi, my ears definitely perked when I heard the Synergy name. I’ve known of the New Zealand born and bred engine manufacturer for years thanks to its heavy involvement in the local speedway scene, and I soon discovered that Synergy had developed a complete ZN6 turn-key, bolt-in kit for its unique 2.4 and 3.0-litre 32-valve, flat-plane crank V8s – no drilling, cutting, welding or panel-beating required.

Synergy V8 24

I wasn’t in the position to fly over to Japan and try to convince JUN to let me drive its hyper-lemon machine, but with a trip back home for summer planned, it turns out I wouldn’t have to; Synergy had built their own demo car and they were more than happy for me to come and check out the operation, and most importantly get behind the wheel.

Synergy V8 01

To create the motor, the team machines a crankcase from 6061-T6 billet alloy using their own full cradle, low windage and fully compartmentalised dry-sump design.

Synergy V8 07

The engine mounts are actually integrated into the crank case.

Synergy V8 03

The flat-plane crankshaft itself is machine from vacuum-refined, low-alloy steel billet, and is nitride coated.

Synergy V8 04

Forged 4340 steel H-beam conrods and super-light alloy pistons are then installed with ARP fasteners.

Synergy V8 10

If you read the original JUN feature, you’ll know that the heads are actually Kawasaki-derived – all-alloy DOHC 16-valve examples as used on the ZX12R to be exact. Because no one knows how to make hard-revving, screaming heads reliable and efficient better than superbike manufacturers, right? In case you were wondering, the engine in the foreground of this particular shot still has the Kawasaki block attached and has been used for testing purposes, while the one behind it is a V8 running headers designed for speedway racing.

Synergy V8 09

As you can see, so much development has gone into these engines over the last seven years, and they’ve been built to last. This particular engine that was sitting in the shop is actually the first Synergy V8, built back in 2006. It’s been absolutely hammered since then and has a bunch of Midget feature race wins under its belt, as well as the Australian Speedcar Championship in ’08.

Synergy V8 36

While visiting, I was also able to check out the engine dyno facility, and was pleased to find both the directors of Synergy, Nick Rogers on the left and Simon Longdill on the right, testing a brand new engine. Nick and Simon are both mechanical engineers with a bachelor and PHd respectively, and I can confirm that listening to a technical conversation between the two is a quick way to make a man feel like he probably shouldn’t have dropped out of school so early…

I was able to throw my GoPro in the room before the engine was fired up – just listen to that scream! As nice as it is to get shaken to bits standing next to an engine on the dyno, it was time to get out and see exactly how this motor transforms an already very fun car.

In The Real World
Synergy V8 16

Synergy is based quite close to the east coast of New Zealand, just south of Auckland City. Locals such as myself have been using the amazing roads that wind along the coast and through the steep, hilly terrain for years as a testing ground. But first, we’d need gas – just your usual 98RON (93 in the USA) high octane pump gas, though, nothing special is required.

Synergy V8 15

Nick was good enough to come out with me, as shooting some decent action shoots might prove a little tricky during a solo mission. With a full tank, we headed off into the hills, and the instructions were clear: it’s built to be thrashed, go for it! This was to be a test in the real world, not on the race track.

Synergy V8 35

Driving around town, I have to say that the Synergy 86 is a little trickier than a factory car. But it’s nothing unbearable and to be expected when you’re completely changing the dynamics of an engine, going to an ITB set up and replacing the clutch with something built to take much more power. The factory 6-speed gearbox remains however, as it is more than capable of taking any abuse the tiny V8 can throw at it.

Synergy V8 40

So how much more power are we talking exactly? Here’s the stats: the original 4U-GSE/FA20 flat four-cylinder makes 197hp at 7000rpm and 151ft-lb at 6400rpm. The base Synergy motor as found in this particular car makes 365hp at 10,300rpm and 197ft-lb at 8000rpm.

Synergy V8 39

The kit also drops the weight of the car by 30kg (66lb), as well as changing the distribution from 56/44 to 54/46 . The centre of gravity has gone from 460mm to 455mm too, remembering that we’re swapping from a small boxer engine – chosen in the first place for its excellent centre of gravity characteristics.

Synergy V8 18

To match the improved power and dynamics of the car, Synergy fitted a set of big AP Racing brakes.

Synergy V8 42

As well as Öhlins Road & Track coilovers to drop the body lower over a set of Enkei PF01s.

Synergy V8 06

Otherwise, the car is fairly well stock, with a complete interior. That said, the Synergy kit comes with these cool replacement dials.

Synergy V8 14

But the demo car was running the optional MoTeC dash – it’s not essential, but man, when accompanied by that sound, it does make you feel like you’re driving something pretty damn interesting.

Synergy V8 17

Adrift amongst a sea of super-slammed, super-wide, ultra-aggressive looking but usually fairly mechanically-stock ZN6 builds, I really quite enjoy the lack of exterior enhancements on the Synergy 86. It is, dare I say it, a sleeper of sorts – a whole lot of screaming revolutions and power hidden inside a respected, yet easily dismissed (straight-line speed wise) chassis. So what does that all mean when you finally make it out of the suburbs and onto some amazing deserted roads?

Unleash The Revs
Synergy V8 21

Well, those roads also turned out to be the slightly damp, resulting in some fairly greasy conditions – a little sketchy, but nothing the ZN6 can’t handle!

Synergy V8 27

Heading out towards the coast, I was able to open the 86 up properly for the first time as the traffic thinned out. Or so I thought… Planting boot, the revs rose and as the ITBs and the 3-inch exhaust began to scream, I began my customary involuntary ‘woohoo’ noises, only to be met with a quizzical look from Nick sitting in the passenger seat.

Synergy V8 26

He laughed, and said; “so that was about 9,000rpm, you’ve still got a few thousand left to go and you haven’t reached peak power yet.” It seemed wrong, but sure enough, the next time I put my foot down, I watched the MoTeC dash, and as the V8 reached a howling 9000rpm, I had to fight the urge to lift off and change gears – it was quite unnatural to stay in it and find the limiter at 11,600rpm.

Synergy V8 28

But that’s where this V8 comes alive. If I thought I had found the power at nine, I was wrong. The punch this thing pulls at high RPM is a shock to the system.

Synergy V8 30

It can best be described as having two motors, somehow set up in a sequential fashion. First, there’s what feels like a beefed-up factory engine, which is nice and pleasant enough as you drive through the lower revs. Reach what would normally be the stock 7500rpm limiter, and the ‘second engine’, where all the power is, kicks in.

Synergy V8 32

And everything about it is ferocious. The pull and the sound demands your full attention when you’re up at such high RPMs, and although the car still behaves as an 86 should, it’s definitely not the sort of machine you can drive fast, lazily. It’s a true driver’s car that demands your full attention.

Actually, the stock 86 is already considered a great driver’s car – so let’s call the Synergy 86 an ‘advanced driver’s car’. Although the road surface was extremely greasy and I clearly can’t tighten up a GoPro mount to save myself, this little clip should give you a feel for driving the car on a very tight mountain pass.

Synergy V8 20

It’s an immeasurably fun car to hoon, but you do need to embrace the revs – something that certainly takes some getting used to – to get to that level. Heading back towards the city, constantly resisting the urge to be ‘that guy’ and find any excuse to give it some revs, purely for the high-pitched noise alone, I wondered about just how usable the Synergy 86 is as a road car. And I don’t mean it’s a pain to drive in traffic, it’s perfectly fine and behaves well enough. The real question is; how often are you going to be able to use 11,000rpm on the road?

Synergy V8 33

Sure, you’ll be able to go for blasts like I just did, but personally, I see this package suiting an 86 that was destined for a little track work, where you’d be able to get the most out of all those screaming RPMs. Whether that be a fun street car that heads to club days on the weekend, or a dedicated racer. This engine is screaming for a hammering, and I’m just not sure how often you can give it what it wants out on the road.

Synergy V8 29

At the end of the day, I guess that completely depends on the sort of driver you are, and just how often you’re willing to scare pedestrians and risk losing your license.

Synergy V8 22

My day out with the Synergy 86, the writing of this article and the turn-key nature of the 86 package got me thinking, as much as I liked the sleeper nature of this particular car, how would I build my own version? Assuming my bank account was looking a little less dismal than it is right now, I think I’d be ticking the option boxes at Synergy and running the their bigger 3.0-litre monster version of the same motor along with their own sequential gearbox setup in a jet-black KM4SH-kitted street legal weekend racer. Stripped interior, half-cage, seats, some nice KW coilovers, uprated sway bars and a set of RAYS Volk Racing ZE40s wrapped in wide semi-slicks – the perfect look and feel to match all that sound and power! What about you?

Peter Kelly
Editor-in-Chief
Instagram: speedhunters_pedey
pedey@speedhunters.com

More stories from New Zealand on Speedhunters 

Bonus Images
Synergy V8 02
Synergy V8 05
Synergy V8 08
Synergy V8 11
Synergy V8 12
Synergy V8 13
Synergy V8 23
Synergy V8 25
Synergy V8 34
Synergy V8 37
Synergy V8 38

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85 comments
r54dbnn
r54dbnn

Dang! 11k for a V8. I'm no mechanic, nor am I an expert but I'm pretty sure that's a lot for a big engine such as the V8...

mugshotmarlry
mugshotmarlry

It all depends on the stroke. Short stroke (picture crank oscillating diameter being super small) where the piston only moves up and down a few inches. There are positives and negatives too it, with one positive of very high rpms.

tekniq
tekniq

I can't believe no one has noticed this is like the new version of Takumi's 86 when his dad swapped in the high revving Formula Atlantic 20 Valve.  11K+ revs!  Now with this kit being out, I know exactly what engine I would want if I owned the new FRS/BRZ. 


Amazing job team Synergy!!  I seriously wish you guys the most success out there as I would be a customer if I was in the market!

Afonsoae82gt
Afonsoae82gt

Is it possible to assemble that KIT on a LHD gt86 version?

hendymenn
hendymenn

put in a carbon fiber hood BAM! the same tofu boy lived again!

Attila_UK
Attila_UK

Cracking article and it looks like a great engine, similar to the powertec units used in some Radical racers. I know what you mean about it feeling alien to rev that high, the first time I took my old GSXR600 track bike out I couldn't get my head around revving it to nearly 16k rpm, once you are used to it, it gets seriously addictive though.

Kenny
Kenny

Seriously impressive engine, I would love to see or hear more about the design aspect, technical details and any challenges that cropped up. What V angle did ye use, are cam chains running off both ends of the crank or is one head on "backwards"?

Val
Val

Drop it in a Caterham next.

KrisMoffatt
KrisMoffatt

Now to chuck the 3L in something properly silly. Like my Mondeo :P


Actually, that's not too silly of an idea, apart from the obvious challenges of keeping it FWD. Superb chassis, handles really well for a big nose heavy FWD, and its roughly the same size as the FA20, which means its smaller than the behemoth Duratec V6 that mine has. I'm actually liking the sound of this more and more


Don't judge me okay......

Chri5 Duncan
Chri5 Duncan

The vid is not that great. It doesn't even sound like it's close to being red-lined.

JerryChen2
JerryChen2

this would be amazing in a NA Miata

86_4_life
86_4_life

...what if they add a turbo.....? km4sh in white with custom carbon fibre 5Axis 7 wheels, super tint, carbon accessories and a small lip csl style carbon trunk, roof and hood. 

scracha
scracha

Umm...I'd perhaps change the cover shot of you crossing the solid yellow lines

JamesChaulk
JamesChaulk

Where can the engine be purchased, I can't find anything online, I think that would be amazing to own for its subtlety it makes me want to own an frs even more now. It sounds very tame even at higher rpms.

JamesChaulk
JamesChaulk

Yeah I checked it out, $52,100 USD for the engine described, I guess I can throw that idea out the window :( oh well it is understandable. It includes a high review engine, a new computer, a full 3 in. exhaust and more.

PoorUniStudent
PoorUniStudent

As a studying mechanical engineer myself, this story put a huge smile on my face and a large dreaming cloud above my head. I would love to do what these guys are doing with some friends I've made at uni!


And those roads! 10/10 read (and viewing).

Diu9Lei
Diu9Lei

The petrol station he went to is literally a 2 minute drive away from my house LOL

Ammar Abidi
Ammar Abidi

Holy cow! Amazing car but that last paragraph was literally the most sponser filled peice I have seen on this website. And you guys forgot to mention the Takata belts.

KiwiMotoring
KiwiMotoring

@Ammar Abidi How dare they occasionally mention the companies that fund this free-to-view website for car enthusiasts worldwide.

Peter_Kelly
Peter_Kelly moderator

@Ammar Abidi I thought about that when I was writing this story and I tried to think of other parts that I would rather use instead, but I couldn't. I guess that means Speedhunters has all the right partners...

Smiggins
Smiggins

Very cool. But loses the Japanese soul.

Hanma
Hanma

@Smiggins Japanese soul? It's essentially two Japanese superbike motors Frankensteined together...

Bullet92
Bullet92

Hearing the Synergy engine sound makes me think and wonder it could be a good engine choice for my Mazda RX8. Hey Peter, does the guys at Synergy only bulid the engine for the 86/BRZ or it can fit in any car?

Peter_Kelly
Peter_Kelly moderator

@Bullet92 I believe this engine is compatible with almost anything, and they can make kits to suit whatever car. I'll see if I can get Nick on here to confirm.

Nick_Synergy
Nick_Synergy

The engine is small and light enough that it will fit in the engine bay of most cars. It's much better suited to lightweight cars (I.e. Not a good candidate for a 2 tonne whale). We don't make complete kits for other cars but are happy to build and send an engine only kit (including gearbox and clutch adaptions to suit your application.). Designing and manufacturing a complete bolt in kit is a huge amount of work - so we would likely need to pass on the development cost for a 1-off kit.

iProGam3r
iProGam3r

Videos and a longer article, this is what we want!

austintpeterson
austintpeterson

"I can best be described as having two motors, somehow set up in a sequential fashion." Did you mean "It" at the beginning of that sentence? not trying to be a dick, but i think you might have a typo.

Asian_Drifter
Asian_Drifter

I heard synergy 86 v8 sounds like d old 4AGE series.... i wonder if the engineer could maintain d legendary sound of 4AGE but. Uprated engine HP and designed iy would be great...

turbo BEAMS ae86
turbo BEAMS ae86

@Asian_Drifter i have many engines on my life, and still miss that 4AGE..silver top..black top...16v...ALL was villanous noise

Kento_bento
Kento_bento

So answer me this, if you slap on a turbo and rock solid suspension mods, will this shred horse thief mile like the best of them LSs and 2jz? Or is there an inherent lack of torque from essentially two motorcycle engines put together?

MaxFnPower
MaxFnPower

@Kento_bento Hmm im thinking your missing the point of this engine

kento_bento
kento_bento

Hmmm, It seems as I have. I guess I should apologize for strictly thinking in regards to my particular interest of drifting. So now after researching a bit more and finding out how pricey this engine swap is, what exactly would this type of engine be used for? Let me rephrase that, Why is this particular engine advantageous to other swaps that exist? Now understand that I'm not bashing Synergy for their excellent work in developing the kit, however could you or anyone else help me wrap my head around the concept.

Dohnuts
Dohnuts

@kento_bento Low torque high rev high horse power, think F1, light cars with high hp and low torque.

Nick_Synergy
Nick_Synergy

The key here is weight, car balance and engine response. The engine is lighter than stock and almost double the power (or ~500hp for the 3L option). It is a high revving naturally aspirated engine with lightening throttle response and an amazing sound. A Torque figure at the engine is irrelevant(apart from the shape of the torque curve) without considering power and gear ratio. The high rpm allows a much shorter final drive ratio (we use 4.856 and JUN use 5.125) and you can still hold gears to higher speeds. As such, the torque/power at the wheels at any given speed is MUCH higher than stock!

Imagine a stripped 86, weighing ~1000 kg with a 500hp 3L Synergy V8 - pretty sure that would 'shred horse thief mile' better than most...

kento_bento
kento_bento

Thanks everyone including Nick from Synergy for explaining the whole shebang for me!

Jon
Jon

Imagine that 500hp Synergy V8 in a 240Z.... If only I had the money.

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