#iamthespeedhunter: This One Is For You

Technically speaking, these are all for you. #IAMTHESPEEDHUNTER was put together to give you a voice on Speedhunters. Although it’s primarily photography based, we also love to see your videos and articles too. All the contact details you need are at the bottom of every IATS related post, along with tips to help you get featured. Getting featured is no mean feat either, we really expect the best from you and want to inspire and push you to being the best Speedhunters you can be. This is why we only showcase a small selection every week because, and lets be honest here, if we featured every submission it just wouldn’t be as special or as much of an achievement. If you have any ideas for different things or stories you would like to see on #IAMTHESPEEDHUNTER, let us know in the comments below.

(Above) How good is this. The skill involved to capture something as beautiful and painterly as this requires dedication and lots of practice. A very slow shutter speed coupled with a very fast moving car really highlights the speed of a modern Formula 1 car.

We all know that car shows can be a nightmare to photograph. What Tyrone has done here is create something visually interesting by using what I think is the open bonnet of another car to frame his subject. Good exposure and colour treatment are always a big help too.

A perfect example of how to shoot a simple three-quarters shot of any car. Shallow depth of field (whilst still keeping the car sharp back to front) with the face of the rim showing towards the camera.

This was one of my favourites this week, such an interesting shot of a recognisable face. It pays to move around and use your eyes to see the photo before you put your eye behind the lens.

When shooting a little detail like this at an oblique angle, it can be all too easy to use too shallow a depth of field which results in the detail being lost. This however is just right. Ignoring the badge for a second and look along the rub strip and notice how it’s blurred, sharp and then blurred again. The sharp area is your depth of field and if you were to use a higher f/number this area would be larger. Similarly, if you were to use a smaller f/number this area would be smaller.

Mathieu has been capturing some sublime exotics in Paris. The orange Lamborghini with the muted background and little bit of orange flare at the top add up to something that is much more than a snapshot.

I always get excited when I see interesting tracking shots come in through any of our feeds. I’ve personally grown tired of rig shots and believe you just can’t beat a good tracking shot to capture a car’s natural movement.

A rare video submission this week coming from Thomas Vouzela in France. We would love to see more of your videos here so don’t be shy!

We’re still getting a couple of stragglers from last month’s theme, but since we’re the friendly sort we will still share them. If you look at the front of the car here, you can see that the shutter speed was slow enough to capture the movement of the car as it pivots around its front axle. It’s really incredible the detail you can pick up from a still image.

A simple but well executed shot by Bruno here. By using the foliage in the foreground to frame the car, he has created something more interesting.

Sometimes, you don’t need to do anything but be in the right place at the right time and let the subject do all the hard work.

More slow shutter sublimity.

I’m really intrigued by this stunning side profile shot by Andrey. I can’t decide if it’s excellent positioning of the car relative to the sunlight, or a little bit of subtle off-camera flash to balance the ambient light. Either way it’s a brilliant capture.

There are the rare occasions that you can get away with tilting the camera excessively and I think this is one of them. By exposing for the brightest source of light in the frame, Alberto has captured the car crossing through the light before vanishing into the darkness again.

We’re not forgetting our Instagram feed either. In fact I think we’re long overdue a round up on cell phone photography. What say you friends?

Paddy McGrath



We created #IAMTHESPEEDHUNTER to allow you the opportunity to share your skills and car culture experiences from around the globe with the rest of the Speedhunters audience.

How do you get involved? It’s simple…

Flickr - Join our #IAMTHESPEEDHUNTER Flickr Group and share your favourite photos with us and others.
Instagram – Follow us on Instagram at @TheSpeedhunters and tag your own car culture images with #IAMTHESPEEDHUNTER
Twitter – Follow us on Twitter at @SPEEDHUNTERS and share your tweets with the #IAMTHESPEEDHUNTER hashtag.
Tumblr – Visit our Tumblr page to view the latest #IAMTHESPEEDHUNTER tagged images.
E-Mail – If you’ve been to a cool event and captured some amazing images, be sure to e-mail them to us on iamthespeedhunter@dev.speedhunters.com and tell us a little bit about the event. The images need to be a minimum of 800×533 pixels.

Have you submitted already but yet been featured? Here are some tips to help you…

DO – Submit your best work, regardless of when it was taken.
DO – Take your time shooting and consider each detail
DO – Try to submit each image no larger than 1000PX wide.
DON’T – Put a huge watermark on it. We’ll make sure you’re credited!
DON’T – Send us huge image files that kill our e-mail system!




写真は、800×533 ピクセル以上のJPGのフォーマットでお願いします。


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carlos benitez
carlos benitez

Wow. Thank you for posting my photo!

It means a lot to me!

Rob Blank
Rob Blank

Thanx for posting my picture


Thanks a lot for posting my picture of  Mustang! :)


Holy ...... that sprint car shot!!!


Need more Cellphone updates, like it or not it's a growing marking that can't be ignored!


Awesome! Thanks for posting my picture!


This is just great! Good job! eep it going!


I'm at work and my cubicle mates just wondered if I won the lottery! Nah, I just saw my picture on the SpeedHunters page. Looking forward to submitting for challenges in the future. Thanks, Anthony


I can't wait for the cellphone theme. Not having a DSLR means that I always have to hunt with my phone, and working within the limitations of the built in camera is challenging


that nsx is just pure awesome!


Picture was taken with natural light towards the sun. I was lazy to turn off the flash and I just turned it back 


 @D1RGE EXE That's what we in the sprint car community call a bad day.