Cruising New Zealand In A ’67 Impala

My name is Peter Kelly and I’m the editor of New Zealand Performance Car magazine. With Speedhunters’ America theme happening, I was asked by the team to write a guest post, no doubt due to my perceived conflict of occupation – running a staunchly import-only magazine, and choice of vehicle – a 1967 Fastback Chevrolet Impala.

My life has always revolved around Japanese performance vehicles, right from when I bought my first turbocharged vehicle at sixteen. In the many years since, I’ve owned and modified a range of interesting Japanese cars, including a JZX90 Toyota Mark II featured on Speedhunters many moons ago, and have been working as a journalist within the import industry for the last decade. For a good percentage of the years since getting my first car, I had an active dislike for all things American automotive – I’ve always dismissed the American vehicle for, arguably, everything it stands for. Compared to the light, high-tech and exceptionally clever JDM vehicles that I loved, lived and breathed every day, these behemoths seemed to me like lumbering, inefficient land yachts – the epitome of stereotypical American excess. While that view hasn’t really changed, it’s those same attributes I used to hate, that I now love, thanks to a chance sighting of a stock standard 1967 Impala Coupe near my home in Auckland about five years ago. I was struck by it’s overt, gaudy but at the same time strikingly beautiful appearance and although I didn’t go straight out and buy one, I did from that day on, have a new appreciation and love for classic American cars. I also promised myself that when the time was right, I’d own a 67 Impala Fastback Coupe – in my eyes, the prettiest American car ever made (though I’m sure readers will have their own opinions on this).

After first dipping my toes into GM ownership with a 1967 Cadillac Coupe De Ville a few years back, I quickly figured out that there was little point in pouring money into a car that was never really the dream, so I sold up for a tidy profit (another benefit I was far from accustomed to coming from JDM cars), and eventually found a beat-up numbers-matching Impala fresh out of Arizona.

The next year was spent restoring the car with help from friends, a few of whom didn’t really get it, but were there nonetheless. New chrome, a full panel and paint, carpets and plenty of rust removal began to cut into the wallet pretty deep.

Despite some internet chatter, the odd email and awkward hostile conversation from people who thought that it was wrong someone in my position should be building a car like this, I persevered and the end result is exactly how I’d imagined it would be.

The paint, applied by Grant at Auckland’s GT Refinishers, is a modified Jaguar gold from PPG. Coming from Japanese cars, I never actually thought about how much more paint you’ll need to purchase to cover a car like this, but at 5.4 metres long and a little over 2-metres wide, the budget blew out pretty quickly, especially when factoring in the extra labour involved in getting those massive panels perfect.

The car sits very low on 14-inch reverse offset (around -10) wires by way of static suspension, which I think goes a great way towards enhancing its soft, flowing lines. People always ask my why I’ve never installed hydraulics or bags in the Impala – simply put, though I appreciate juice and air, it’s just not me and I didn’t want to ruin the originality of the car.

To me, of all the Impala generations, the 67/68 is the most beautiful. It’s massive hips, more pronounced than the similar 65/66, flow effortlessly towards the rear of the car, meeting up with the 67/68’s unique fastback roofline at the simple, clean taillights.

This is the easiest way to tell the two fastback years apart – the 67 uses three-pane rectangular lights above the bumper as pictured, whereas GM changed to six big round lights recessed into the bumper itself the year after.

Interior-wise, the factory gold-vinyl interior remains because, well, it’s just so incredibly ugly that it does a full circle and once again becomes strangely appealing.

Until this car came to New Zealand, it was owned by one family since new, with ownership going from father, to mother and then to son as the years rolled on. This would explain the very tidy condition of the gaudy gold covering the entire living space of the car. The glove box still contains the original dealership papers, service history and a 1995 Blockbuster receipt for Sister Act II on VHS.

The Impala runs the factory-fitted 327ci small block V8, which I’ve kept as original as possible. It’s not going to propel the car to a 10-second quarter mile, but that was never the point – this car never had to be fast.

With six seats (eight in a pinch), a good sound system and a strong, reliable driveline, the Impala has improved my life considerably over the three years since it’s been on the road. No doubt, it’ll probably be the summers spent cruising New Zealand’s beach towns and car festivals that I’ll remember fondly in my old age. I’m not sure I could say that about any other car I’ve owned…

Though I will always love Japanese cars and will continue to own and modify them for the rest of my life, in terms of pure aesthetics and impact, to me, there are few JDM machines that can match the beauty and pure presence of this “coke bottle” era in American motoring. I’ll admit that I used to be very one-eyed when it came to cars, but owning, driving and maintaining this Chev has helped me to become what I now think of as a true car enthusiast – someone with a completely open mind to all types of vehicles.

While I’m sure not everyone will share or even understand my unbridled love for my Impala, for all its flaws, to me it’s quite possibly the most beautiful thing I’ve ever laid eyes on. It’s a car that makes me fight a smile every time the garage door rolls up, and the day I stop feeling like a giddy child when I pump the accelerator a few times and turn the key on first start up, is the day I know it’s time to move on. Realistically, I’m not sure I can ever see that happening… #joyofmachine

-Peter Kelly


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29 comments
johnmmeza
johnmmeza

Great write up!!! You have a beautiful Impala...reminds me of when i got my first car in High School. A 1964 impala and i did my best with my part-time job to restore it. Unfortunately my mother sold it when i left to the military and i have yet to find another one like it. Enjoy this work of art.

datsunsss
datsunsss

Very, very nicely put together Impala man, well done! 

Gerben aka Suburuuh
Gerben aka Suburuuh

Sublime! Can't argue this high end outcome for a 'JDM kind of guy' ;)

kadett 244
kadett 244

I think I am just after having the same moment as you although I've always admired Muscle cars.I had never seen/noticed this shape Impala and now it is top of my US 'want' list!Thanks for sharing 

tenpennyjimmy
tenpennyjimmy

One can disapprove of this sort of thing... but try, just try, not to like it. It won't work.

 

Flawless.

Lou
Lou

full frame shot of image 6 or 12 would be such a nice desktop

ClaytonPayton
ClaytonPayton

damn, this is a great build!  attention to clean details, and a perfect stance and appropriate wheel choice. love it!

E
E

Desktop of 1st pic please!

weasel
weasel

the wheels, height and paint make this thing oh so awesome.

 

 

 

ericbauer
ericbauer

Is it because of the amount of wide angle in the camera lens, or does the impala actually not fit in the typical kiwi garage? (3rd pic down)

 

beautiful car!

Gomez85
Gomez85

Great read! I could just imagine cruising to my old boss's family farm in Wellsford listening to some great road music in this beast. One of my first cars to modify was a 69 Impala wagon (talk about a land yacht, you had to pack a lunch just to walk around it).

Your car is stunning, good on ya! 

FunctionFirst
FunctionFirst

I don't think people understand what it feels like to just cruise in a giant piece of Americana. It just makes every trip better, every mile more meaningful and you'll often find yourself taking the longest route to any destination just because you want to enjoy the ride more. I don't know about what happens in NZ, but in the US every time you go for a ride people will always look at you in a car like that, heads turn and strangers will always come up to chat about it. It always happens.

 

It's a beautiful car, and to me comes in a close third behind a first-gen Camaro and a 66-67 Chevelle. Good times.

TomHoward
TomHoward

Never really seen a 67 model Impala, That is stunning though! Love the long sweeping lines.

zephoto
zephoto

That is quite the land yacht.  I could see myself rolling around in that for sure.

SimonRaymondWatling
SimonRaymondWatling

truly beautiful machine cousin :D .. I really liked the bit in the article when you talked about how this is what you will remember when your older.. killer job dude :)

Option86
Option86

Gorgeous. My thumbs can go no higher!! Hahaha

KietaPhillips
KietaPhillips

Always did love the flow of this model, kudos on the spoke wheels.

BasedHero
BasedHero

This car is beyond beautiful.

RyanKuan
RyanKuan

Awesome Impala and great read. It's sometimes hard for people to understand and appreciate other car cultures, and to me, what you said nailed it perfectly. We all have the type of car/scene we love, but it's good to look at what others in different cultures are doing and appreciate the effort that goes into these builds.

hanablemoore
hanablemoore

One of my favorite years next to the sixty 1.  Its really a beautiful car and this is a nice example. I love all cars and if i had a 67 i would park it next to my e46 m3 and fc in my 300 plus car garage. Of course this  is a dream i plan to fulfill in the next 30 years or sooner.:}

dadecode
dadecode

 @FunctionFirst AGREED! One of my best memories is a cross country drive I took in my 1967 Pontiac Catalina 2dr Hardtop (same exact fast back roof as the Impala featured here but with a front and rear end that mimicked Jet intakes) It was in mint condition, gold with a white roof. EVERYWHERE I went people came from no where to look, ask or talk about the car. It got so I started dreading stopping to fill her up. That car drove 2800 miles in two days with nary a complaint except requiring a chassi lube after a severe down pour in Alabama. And I till remember vividly the soothing lope of it's big 400 Cubic Inch motor as I cruised into night at 70mph. 

 

To this day I still keep an eye out for another car of it's caliber. There is nothing like pulling onto the open road at the helm of such a grand feeling  car. You can't help but feel like a king behind the wheel of one. With cars like the 1967 Impala, it's no wonder GM and Chevy had the Top selling cars in the world at the time. Just think, this 1967 Impala Hardtop was a common man's car! Yet look at all the style and presence.


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