Through My Lens: Hangin’ Around In Asia

During my career I’ve mostly followed car culture in North America; I’ve only recently experienced what’s going on over in Europe and I’m pretty late to the Asian automotive scene, so this recent Asia tour was the perfect time for me to do a bit of catching up. I have always wanted to shoot wheel-to-wheel racing in Asia, so I dove in head first and had the chance to photograph some very interesting things.

I went from one extreme end of the spectrum to the other, as I started my tour in the Japanese countryside at Autopolis Raceway. In case you missed it you can read more about the moist Super Taikyu race. I have shot many festivals and events in Japan, but believe it or not, Super Taikyu was my very first race in the land of the Rising Sun.

The other end of the spectrum was the financial hub of Asia, the city of Hong Kong. Although, before I got to enjoy the sights and smells of the former British territory…

…I was to attend the annual Grand Prix of Macau, also for the very first time. The city of Macau is like most major cities in China: the sun rarely comes out. Nearby factories on mainland China pump out enough pollution to cover everything in fog.

The polution produces a very soft, defused light that is perfect for wedding photography. These people went on with their special day shooting photos while one of the biggest street races in the world rumbled on beneath them.

It was crazy to me that in the daytime there was a race track running through the main streets of this tiny city of casinos and shopping malls, but…

…at night the race track turns into a full-on highway of buses and taxis carrying tourists and gamblers.

It all comes alive when it gets dark, as the lights turn on and you question if you are in a Chinese territory or in Las Vegas.

But under all that glamour in a tiny little building in downtown Macau was a display of history that I will never forget. This was the Grand Prix of Macau museum.

I never had the chance to see Ayrton Senna race in person, but just seeing his personal items this close made me a bit emotional.

The center piece is the actual car that he used to win the very first Formula 3 Macau Grand Prix back in 1983.

Just a few steps away was Michael Schumacher’s winning Kawai Steel Formula 3 car from 1990. It’s crazy to think that 17 of this year’s 24 registered Formula 1 drivers have raced in Macau.

There was even a little slot-car track that was the shape of Circuito da Guia.

There were also some really elaborate set-ups for some of the old DTM cars from the ’90s. It would be so cool to see them bring some of these cars back out one day.

This old open-wheeled race car belonged to one of the founding fathers of the Macau Grand Prix, the late Teddy Yip, who ran several Formula 1 teams during the ’70s and ’80s. As a driver he had even entered a few Macau races himself and earned a third place podium back in 1963.

He was also a back-up driver in Formula for the Ensign team in 1974. He subsequently started his own F1 team in 1978 called Theodore Racing, whose most notable accomplishment was a win at the non-championship International Trophy at Silverstone Circuit in the UK. In honor of Teddy’s accomplishments, they named a section of the track after him.

Because this race track was only temporary and in the middle of a sprawling city, it presented interesting challenges when trying to get around.

For example, I followed Charles to the drivers’ meeting which was held quite a long walk away from the paddock. On the plus side there was some interesting scenery along the way.

Many of the new buildings in Macau are built over water, because they have simply run out of space. There is a rumor that the government is planning on building new pits in place of this ferry port.

Interestingly enough the casinos are not the only buildings that had themes. This was the convention center.

Inside this building was where they held the drivers’ briefings.

Inside was pretty normal, like any convention center. These drivers’ meetings were translated into multiple languages on the spot so everyone could understand what was being said.

Getting around the paddock was relatively easy, but the challenge was getting to each corner around the hot track.

There was a media shuttle service, but it seemed like I was the only one who used it to get about – which made me wonder how all the other media made their way around.

Since the track uses most of the main roads, the only way to get around is to use the back roads – and it takes forever to get anywhere. They can be very steep and made out of cobblestones.

On top of that, once the shuttle drops you off you still had to hike a considerable distance on public sidewalks to get to any shooting locations. I had many stares over the weekend as people probably thought I just robbed a camera store.

Many places can only be found with some inside information. For example, there are hotels that let you shoot from their balcony. You just have to find them and also find a way to get to them. Which also meant they were open to the public.

It seemed like none of the people who live there noticed what was going on. Maybe this race has become such a part of everyone’s daily life that it has become the norm to see race cars on the streets of Macau.

They kind of just continue on their business as ear-piercingly loud exhaust notes echo all around them.

Although, pedestrians did stop and watch if there was an incident on course.

This was one of the things that particularly interested me. I also noticed you Speedhunters out there leaving some comments and asking to know more about their extraction methods.

As I have said before the entire course is lined with giant cranes. However, there are still some spots where the cranes can not get to: for example, there is no way they could pull this BMW out from under this overpass with a crane. All they could do is jack the car up with hand-jacks and place it on dollies while the driver of the car watched in horror.

All of the track marshals are volunteers. There is no way this race would run so smoothly without these guys. They are everyday people like you and me, but they don’t mind donating their time to help out once a year. After all it is a relatively small community.

Once the car is pushed out into the open, the crane easily picks it up and drops it off in the nearest open area.

Even the photographers helped with the extraction. The faster things got done the faster the safety car could come off track.

Once the track went cold a flat-bed tow truck could come along and pick up the disabled car for a safe journey back to the pits.

Getting to different parts of the track was a relatively easy task compared with trying to return to the paddock. I either had to walk a few miles back or the most painless way was to go to a hotel and hail a cab.

Taxis are not allowed to stop anywhere but designated locations like large hotels. Everyone else had the same idea, so sometimes it took over an hour just to move four miles. I caught up on my sleep in those instances.

Many of you Speedhunters have also been requesting that I should post a few more photos of the Macau Motorcycle Grand Prix. Normally we would not cover motorcycle racing, but motorcycles are just as much a part of the event as any of the four-wheel race cars.

I have never shot professional motorcycle racing before, so it was a real treat for me. This was the start of the 46th running of the Motorcycle Grand Prix.

The race was actually cut short by five laps to a 10-lap race because of a 24-hour rain delay. They just could not run a full length race because it was getting very dark, as you can tell in this photo. Those are just standard neon signs in the background.

It just baffles me that some of these guys still ran tinted visors in the dusk. There were no incidents during the 10-lap race so I guess everyone could see just fine.

This was Michael Rutter’s record breaking eighth victory on the streets of Macau. There really is no other rider out there like him. He finished the race 4.9 seconds ahead of second place.

His form was absolutely perfect and each lap looked identical to the last. I am sure he will be going for victory number nine next year.

I could not help but stare and watch every time the motorcycles came out to practice – and it was the same way for Charles Ng’s crew. What a nice way to take a short break.

After the race many of the riders did tricks and burn-outs, and the crowds went absolutely nuts. They really looked like they were having a blast.

The day before the big race, I followed Charles Ng and his family to a temple so they could pray for his and every competitor’s safety during the main event.

Across the street from the temple was a newspaper stand and this was on the front page of the local paper. The main story was about the death of a second competitor, from the Asian Touring car series. I don’t think I will ever forget that image.

I am not religious, but it may be a sign of some sort when two major incidents happen during a single race weekend.

Once we stepped into the temple it seemed like the noise of honking horns and traffic just melted away. It was peaceful.

There was some really neat -looking statues in and around the ancient building. Macau was under Portuguese rule for over 400 years, but there was still much Chinese influence in the culture.

I can still smell the strong scent of incense as I write this article. Charles’ father is a big supporter of his son’s career choice, so he watches his races whenever he can.

It’s been years since I’ve stepped inside a Chinese temple; it is unfortunate the circumstance called for such a somber mood.

Maybe all the competitors were being a little extra careful, but there were no major crashes on race-day. Charles had a minor incident which knocked him out of both races, but he walked away without injury. You can read more about the race in my interview with Charles.

After the main event I took a short ferry-ride to Hong Kong to check out a little bit of the car culture scene and also to go in search for a rare film camera.

Lucky for me I met up with a taxi driver who is an avid Speedhunters reader. He also happened to be a fan of Charles.

He has actually been a big fan of drifting for many years now and he always told me that he would show me around if I ever came to Hong Kong.

I took him up on that offer and I dragged the native Hong Kong racing driver with me.

I have been looking for a very specific camera for a while now and I had a good feeling I would find it in Hong Kong.

It seems like all the rare cameras that are still in mint condition are located within a few city blocks of this magical city. I love that they take photography so seriously.

After just an hour of searching I found exactly what I was looking for, and it was minty fresh too. A Nikon FM2 Titanium.

Now that the important business was taken care of it was time to see the city.

I’ve been all over mainland China and I have never seen anything like this place. It was very weird for me to see so many exotic cars in an Asian city.

It seems like there was a Lamborghini, Ferrari or Aston Martin around every corner.

Even in the public parking garages there was always a display of amazing cars. It is unfortunate that I did not have enough time to arrange some car features, but it is definitely something that I will have to plan ahead of time next time I am in town.

After a full day of driving around and enough dangling poultry to last a lifetime, it was time for me to call it a night.

Since I joined Speedhunters, I have discovered so many new forms of car culture that I have completely fallen in love with. Many of my friends poke fun at me about how I think everything new I experience always blows my mind: well, it is true. I’ve learned to take in new car culture like it is the best thing ever, because to the guys who started it and live it everyday it really is the best thing ever. So my question is, where do you guys think I should go next?

Larry Chen

larry@dev.speedhunters.com

More stories from the Macau Grand Prix on Speedhunters

More stories from Larry Chen on Speedhunters


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64 comments
boscoschan
boscoschan

Hong Kong People says HI! Contact me if you're ever in town, will show you different car clubs and cultures in Hong Kong... :)`

EricSeanDelaney
EricSeanDelaney

Come to Sno Drift in January!!! You need to see rally!

koko san
koko san

First Desktop with Motorbike nr.9 is worth a prize.

RBJKT
RBJKT moderator

Great post mate. Loving the bikes, particularly that one of the BMW right up against the barrier

stine09
stine09

Just found this site about a month ago and I am sending it to all my friends and we all enjoy every article and the fantastic pictures. If your looking for a place to go and an amazing event to cover the Targa Newfoundland is the place to go! The people are the best, the cars are amazing and diverse and the racing intense. 

D4ilon
D4ilon

If you guys plan on getting some more motorcycles on the page then hit up some Supermoto races.

They aren't really too popular so it's all kind of grassroots, but the driving is just amazing. They drift the bikes into corners and exit them on the rear wheel.

Single most amazing type of motorcycle racing. It's kind of like drifting cars, you don't really get it until you experience it yourself.

Denis T
Denis T

You should do more coverages of motorcycle racing!

Vince RB Slider
Vince RB Slider

Australia for ADGP or Drift Matsuri in Winton, Melbourne, Victoria! 

Mark Reyes
Mark Reyes

Great article!  Love the coverage!  V8 Supercars in Melbourne, Gold Coast or Bathurst!

koko san
koko san

Awesome article! so well balanced and alive.

rkalski
rkalski

larry PLEASE make the cycle trick a wallpaper that is soo sick haha!!

Nikhil_P
Nikhil_P

dont know much about motorbikes but would love to see a bit more of them on Speedhunters!

i guess i can add it to the long list of the things that ive learnt from this site!

 

and great work larry, love the pics!

TreyFiveOhJoe
TreyFiveOhJoe

Truly incredible article! One of the best ever. Thank you for providing such amazing insights. The Macau GP is now officially on my bucket list.

LouisYio
LouisYio

South America and Africa.

Be sure the get your vaccination shots though, haha.

rng
rng

You should do a Finnish Trackday in the Summer. ^^

Altecians
Altecians

Glad to see some of HK in there (my home) whilst im over here in the UK! 

Definitely should do more features around there, the cars are very next level, JDM and Exotics alike.

 

Do more HK!!! 

 

Brian
Brian

I absolutely love the diversity, selection, and arrangement of the car scene in Hong Kong. None of the "because race car" "hellaflush" and "illest" crap. You don't have to follow a trend to get anywhere here, just do your own thing, and it'll catch right on.

teh1337ftw
teh1337ftw

Love the bikes! Thanks for adding more to Speedhunters!

ding0tr0n
ding0tr0n

more phillipines!  or south america!  so colorful and jungly.

 

ooh minty fresh vintage cameras...droool.  what made you want the fm2?

David Karey
David Karey

Larry you gotta go to Australia and shoot V8 Supercars! Excellent trip article.

Castro
Castro

Great photos and article Larry.  Love the light fall off on the motorcycle at dusk.

I also want to skateboard on the side of that Lighthouse looking building, lol.

Larry Chen
Larry Chen moderator

Cool, I will look into. Thanks for telling your friends about Speedhunters.

Larry Chen
Larry Chen moderator

 @TreyFiveOhJoe If you or anyone else goes one of these years then I have done my job. It really is about saving your pennies to experience these things in person.

Larry Chen
Larry Chen moderator

 @LouisYio I am on with those as long as I don't have to take one in the stomach.

Larry Chen
Larry Chen moderator

Tell me a little bit about the car culture in the Philippines.

 

I learned photography on a Nikon FG and I still shoot with it, but it was lacking in features. I just wanted a more precise body that had the highest speed mechanical shutter without getting to fancy. I already shoot with a Leica M6, so I figured I might as well find a nice body for my 50mm f/1.2 nikkor lens that is just laying around.

Larry Chen
Larry Chen moderator

Thanks, maybe in the future. I think that would be an awesome series to cover.

Larry Chen
Larry Chen moderator

 @Castro Yes that is the famous Macau lighthouse that is located on one of the highest peaks on the island. It still shines bright at night too.

Mark Reyes
Mark Reyes

 @Larry Chen Even if you came to one mate, I reckon it'd be awesome.  Melbourne ... just cos you'd get some F1 action in there plus massive celebpalooza.  Gold Coast, cos it's where indy used to be, and it is party town, although there's a law against women flashing their puppies off the hotel balconies now.  Bathurst would be great as it's just the spiritual home of motorsport here in Australia.  You can't go wrong with any of em mate!

KBR
KBR

 @Larry Chen 

 

I can tell Larry more about the Philippines. there's also a huge community of car enthusiasts in the Philippines. from what I can tell, there are different car clubs for different car makes and models and most of the car enthusiast there are purists. from old school to new school cars, purists set-up their cars differently they go purely JDM, USDM or EURO look. also, there are regular car gatherings and "fun runs" from regular guys that drives Corolla's or Civic's to the big timers driving their Porsche's, Lambo's, Ferrari's, etc. every weekend (sat or sunday morning, if theres no rain) these guys can pretty much have the local highway for themselves if they want to and go all out (no speed limit). aside from the regular car gatherings, there are car shows, drift events and even a new standing mile (top speed) racing event that they recently had. anywayz, theres a lot more to do in the Philippines. speedhunting, nature hunting, girl hunting, food hunting, whatever you can think off, they have it there!

 

 

EricSeanDelaney
EricSeanDelaney

@Larry Chen @EricSeanDelaney Eh, only down to the low teens and mid thirties. You loose feeling before you get tell cold anyway!

Larry Chen
Larry Chen moderator

 @Mark Reyes Puppies, I love those things :D

 

I think I would try to hit up Bathurst first.

Larry Chen
Larry Chen moderator

 @KBR Cool, I can't wait to see what Nakai San will come up with over there.

KBR
KBR

 @Larry Chen 

well, technically there are speed limits. but there are days (weekends) that the big timers bring out their cars out so they can "stretch its legs". also, I can send you links or contact info's of people that I know that hosts events out there. also, since there are no "seasons" out there, they have events year round. they have the Lateral Drift event out there (Philippines version of FD but of course, a smaller scale. probably a "pro-am" level here in the US.) there are the 0-400m challenge, the Philippine Festival of Speed, that is coming soon, local car shows, etc. there are cars out there that do not disappoint. I will try to find out some upcoming schedules for next year and will get contact info on the people that hosts the events. also, news from the grapevine that Nakai-San will be out there soon and will be building a RWB car out there.

Larry Chen
Larry Chen moderator

 @KBR Interesting, so no speed limit like the Autobahn? What about other traffic? Are there any links to event coverage or any car festival coverage?

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